Credit Scores Needed To Qualify For A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval?


 

 

Credit Scores Needed To Qualify For A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval
Credit Scores Needed To Qualify For A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval

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Credit Scores Needed To Qualify For A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval

Source: Credit Scores Needed To Qualify For A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval?

Kentucky Housing Down Payment Assistance for 2015 DAP funds for KY First Time Home Buyers


Kentucky Housing Down Payment Assistance for 2015 DAP funds for KY First Time Home Buyers.

 

Down Payment Assistance Program for Jefferson County Kentucky Louisville


Down Payment Assistance Program for Jefferson County Kentucky Louisville.

Louisville Ky Down Payment Assistance Mortgage Program


Louisville Ky Down Payment Assistance Mortgage Program.

Why You Can’t Get a Louisville Kentucky FHA, VA, KHC, USDA, Rural Housing and Fannie Mae Home Loan

Why You Can’t Get a Louisville Kentucky FHA, VA, KHC, USDA, Rural Housing and Fannie Mae Home Loan


Why You Can’t Get a Home Loan.

Why You Can’t Get a Louisville Kentucky FHA, VA, KHC, USDA, Rural Housing and Fannie Mae Home Loan

Credit

This is probably the most common hurdle. Lenders will have a qualifying credit score depending on the loan type, your background and other details. That baseline also applies to anyone else on the mortgage. So you might have an 800 credit score, but if your spouse is lagging at a 530, you’re going to struggle to obtain financing.

Even if you’re going it alone, lenders in community property states may still factor in your spouse’s credit. The average credit score for conventional purchase loans was 762 in September, according to mortgage software firm Ellie Mae. For FHA loans it was 701. Military borrowers interested in using their VA loan benefits will generally need at least a 620 score.

Debt-to-Income Ratio

Conventional and FHA lenders look at two different debt-to-income (DTI) ratios. The first, or front end, ratio compares your monthly income to your housing costs. The second, or back end, ratio considers the percentage of your income that goes toward major revolving debts like the mortgage payment, credit card bills, student loans and others.

Conventional lenders are generally looking for a 28 percent DTI ratio on the front end and 36 percent on the back end. For FHA loans, it’s more like 31/43. The VA program only uses the back-end ratio and wants to see 41 percent or less.

Your DTI ratio may not be an immediate application killer. Lenders calculate it based in part on your estimated monthly mortgage payment. It might break your heart, but you can always run the numbers with a lower loan amount to try and get that ratio into qualifying range.

Cash on Hand

Down payment requirements are here to stay (unless you qualify for a VA- or USDA-backed mortgage). Conventional lenders typically require at least a 5 percent downpayment, while the minimum on FHA loans is 3.5 percent. In addition, you’ll likely need to put down earnest money, which is basically a good-faith deposit with a seller, and be able to cover an appraisal, a home inspection and possibly other up-front costs.

Assets have become increasingly important in this tighter lending environment.

[Related Article: CFPB Could Pass New Mortgage Rules Soon]

Employment

Lenders want to see stable, reliable income and employment that’s likely to continue. The gold standard is generally two years, but that can vary depending on the lender, the loan type and the borrower’s circumstances.

For example, service members who separate from the military and take civilian jobs may not have to wait two years depending on how the new employment relates to their skillset, education and previous work serving our country.

What’s especially problematic is self-employment. There are a lot of unknowns for lenders here, and they’re almost always going to require at least two years of tax returns. Same goes for seasonal workers and those who work on commission.

Bankruptcy or Foreclosure

Foreclosure starts hit a 71-month low in November, according to RealtyTrac, but they’ve impacted hundreds of thousands of homeowners since 2008. More than 1.2 million people filed for bankruptcy protection in federal court in FY2012.

Each presents short- to medium-term obstacles to obtaining home loans. The waiting periods vary by event and by loan type. Bankruptcy means waiting anywhere from two to four years in many cases. The wait after a foreclosure can range from two to seven years.

Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer

(NMLS#57916)
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
800 Stone Creek Pkwy, Ste 7,
Louisville, KY 40223
 Fax:     (502) 327-9119
 
 Company ID #1364 | MB73346

 

Down-payment Assistance Programs Louisville and Kentucky


Down-payment Assistance Programs Louisville and Kentucky.

Can You Afford to Buy a House?


Can You Afford to Buy a House?.

Be sure to factor in all the costs

By Michelle Dawson | Realtor.com

Although the thought of paying a mortgage is more enticing than paying rent, it’s important to understand all the costs involved in buying and owning a home as you determine whether you can afford to join the ranks of homeowners.

Potential buyers sometimes forget to factor in the down payment, homeowners insurance and the possibility of depreciation, as well as the costs associated with closing the transaction, moving, purchasing major appliances, and home, landscape and pool maintenance, not to mention furnishings and design accessories once you move in.
The days of calling up the landlord to fix your problems come to an abrupt halt when you’re a homeowner. You’ll be responsible for everything from malfunctioning appliances to leaky faucets to broken heating and air conditioning units and everything in between. And if you buy an older home, you’ll probably eventually encounter costly repairs, such as replacing the roof or windows.
To determine whether you can afford to buy a home, you should do the following:
1. Determine the property value of homes that interest you. The property value (what the home is worth) is determined by comparing the prices of homes recently sold of similar size in the same neighborhood. Your real estate agent will be able to provide this information to you.
2. Review different mortgage loan types and compare their required down payment amounts to the money you have available. Down payments, based on a percentage of the value of the property and determined by the type of mortgage you select, typically range from three to 20 percent of the property value. Don’t forget to factor in private mortgage insurance, a policy that allows mortgage lenders to recover part of their financial losses if a borrower fails to full re-pay a loan. Mortgage insurance makes it possible to buy a home with as little as 3 percent down. Usually, the lower the down payment, the higher the PMI, which typically will cost somewhere between $40 and $125 a month.
3. Get an estimate of your closing costs, including points (the dollar amount paid to a lender for obtaining a lower interest rate on a loan—one point is one percent of the loan amount), taxes, recording, inspections, prepaid loan interest, title insurance (a policy that insures a home buyer against errors in the title search; cost of the policy is usually a function of the value of the property, and is often borne by the purchaser and/or seller) and financing costs from your mortgage lender or a real estate professional. These will generally add up to between 2 and 7 percent of the property value. You’ll receive an estimate of these costs from your lender after you apply for a mortgage.
4. Add the down payment requirements and the closing costs together to determine the amount of money you’ll need right off the bat. But you’re not done yet.
5. Think about the actual move. Will you hire a moving company or rent a truck? Either way will cost you. The more stuff you have, the more it will cost.
6. Property taxes. Many lenders will require an impound account in which monthly payments for property tax (and often insurance) are paid together with the monthly mortgage payment. You can figure your average annual tax rate will be about 1.5 percent of the purchase price of your home.
7. Next, budget for maintenance and repairs. HouseMaster, a home inspection company with 300 franchises nationwide, said that based on a study that evaluated 2,000 inspection reports, the typical costs of major repairs are:
  • Roofing: $1,500 to $5,000
  • Electrical systems: $20 to $1,500
  • Plumbing systems: $300 to $5,000
  • Central cooling: $800 to $2,500
  • Central heating: $1,500 to $3,000
  • Insulation: $800 to $1,500
  • Structural systems: $3,000 to $1,500
  • Water seepage: $600 to $5,000
Once you crunch the numbers and find you come up a bit short, investigate ways to reduce or creatively fund your down payment—it can come from a variety of sources. Check with your realtor or lender to find out what’s available.
You’ll also need to factor in the cost of homeowners insurance. In addition to the type of construction, age of the home, your credit history and past insurance history, new issues like litigating costly toxic mold cases are raising homeowners insurance rates.
In fact, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners reports that homeowners will spent an average of $822 on homeowners insurance in 2007, the last year data was available.
In your final analysis of whether you can afford to buy a home, you’ll want to weigh the costs with the financial benefits—a consistent mortgage payment (unlike rent, which can increase), the tax benefits (you can deduct, in most cases, mortgage interest, closing costs, and property taxes), and the all-important appreciation factor—the rate of increase in a home’s value.
And of course, you’ll want to weigh perhaps the biggest benefit of all—having a place to call your own.