Kentucky Mortgage Usda Loan Zero Down Home Loans Still Exist


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What is the minimum credit score I need to qualify for a Kentucky FHA, VA, USDA and KHC Conventional mortgage loan in 2018?


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Four things to know about qualifying and closing a mortgage loan for Kentucky First Time Home Buyers

Kentucky First Time Home Buyers Questions Answered Below:

1.  Do Mortgage Interest Rates Change Daily?

Just like the gas prices at the pump,  mortgage rates can change daily or throughout the day.  Typically mortgage rates are published at 10-11 am daily by most lenders and you can lock up through the close of business which is usually around 6-7 PM.  Mortgage rates can change up or down throughout the day based on various financial, economics, and geopolitical news in the US Financial markets and World markets. Generally speaking, good economic news is bad for rates and vice versa, bad economic news is good for mortgage rates.

The good news is this: Once you find a home and get it under contract, you can lock your mortgage loan rate. Typically it takes about 30-45 days to close a mortgage loan in Kentucky, so the typical lock is for 30-60 days. If rates get better you may be able to negotiate a better rate with your lender, but they usually have to improve by at least 25 basis points (.25) to do that. Not all lenders offer this option. The longer you lock the loan, the greater the costs. It is usually free to lock in a loan for up to 90 days without having to pay a fee.

What a lot of lenders are experiencing now is that some loans don’t close on time for various reasons. You can always extend the lock on the loan but it will costs you usually .125 basis points to do so. If you let the lock expire on the loan, then you have to take worse case pricing on that day when you go to relock. It is usually best to extend the lock on your loan.

 

2. What kind of Credit Score Do I need to qualify?

When applying for a mortgage loan, lenders will pull what they call a “tri-merge” credit report which will show three different fico scores from Transunion, Equifax, and Experian. The lenders will throw out the high and low score and take the “middle score” For example, if you had a 614, 610, and 629 score from the three main credit bureaus, your qualifying score would be 614. Most lenders will want at least two scores. So if you only have one score, you may not qualify. Lenders will have to pull their own credit report and scores so if you had it ran somewhere else or saw it on a website or credit card you may own, it will not matter to the lender, because they have to use their own credit report and scores.
Most lenders will pull your credit report for free nowadays so this should not be a big deal as long as your scores are high enough.
The Secondary Market of Mortgage loans offered by FHA, VA, USDA, Fannie Mae, and KHC all have their minimum fico score requirements and lenders will create overlays in addition to what the Government agencies will accept, so even if on paper FHA says they will go down to 580 or 500 in some cases on fico scores, very few lenders will go below the 620 threshold.
If you have low fico scores it may make sense to check around with different lenders to see what their minimum fico scores are for loans.
The lenders I currently deal with have the following fico cutoffs for credit scores:
FHA–580 minimum score
VA—-580 minimum score
Fannie Mae–620 minimum score
USDA–640 minimum score
KHC with Down Payment Assistance –620 minimum score.
As you can see, 620 is the minimum score with most lenders for a FHA, VA, or Fannie Mae loan, and 640 is required for the no down payment programs offered by USDA for Kentucky for First Time Home Buyers wanting to go no money down.

3. What are the down payment requirements?

 
The most popular programs for Kentucky First Time Home Buyers usually involves one of the following housing programs outlined in bold below:
FHA:

FHA will allow a home buyer to purchase a house with as little as 3.5% down. If your credit scores are low, say 680 and below, a lot of times it makes sense to go FHA because everyone pays the same mortgage insurance premiums no matter what your score is, and the down payment can be gifted to you. Meaning you really don’t have to have any skin into the game when it comes to down payment. They even allow down payment assistance through eligible parties (government grants or non-profits). Lastly, FHA will allow for higher debt to income ratios with sometimes getting loan pre-approvals up to 55% of your total gross monthly income.

Fannie Mae:
Fannie Mae requires just 3% down with their new Home Possible Program, but if you use their traditional mortgage loan, then 5% is the Fannie Mae Standard. Fannie Mae will o down to a 620 score, but if your scores are below 680, I would look seriously at the FHA loan program because Fannie Mae has steep increases to the interest rate and the mortgage insurance premiums if your scores are low.
A couple of good things about Fannie Mae is that you can buy a larger priced home and have a large loan amount due to FHA only allowing most Kentucky Home Buyers a maximum mortgage loan amount of $275-to $287k price range while Fannie Mae will go up to Conforming loan limits of $410k.
Lastly when it comes to mortgage insurance, FHA mortgage insurance premiums are for life of loan while Fannie Mae mortgage insurance premiums drop off when you develop 80% equity position in your house.
But as a tell most people, nobody has a loan for 30 years, and the average mortgage is either refinanced or home sold within the first 5-7 years.
VA Loans- 

VA loans offer eligible Veterans and Active Duty Personnel to buy a home going no money down with no monthly mortgage insurance. This is probably the best no money down loan out there since the rates are traditionally very low on comparison to other government insured mortgages and no monthly mortgage insurance. The VA loan can be used anywhere in the state of Kentucky with the maximum VA loan limit being $417k

USDA Loans- 

USDA loans offer people buying a home in rural areas (typically towns of $20k or less) to buy a home going zero down. You cannot currently own another home and there is household income limits of $75,000 for a household family of four, and up to $99,000 for a household of five or more. You search USDA website for eligible areas and household income limits below at the yellow highlighted link :

KHC or Kentucky Housing-
Kentucky First Time Home Buyers typically use KHC for their down payment assistance. KHC currently offers $4500 to $6000 for down payment assistance and sometimes throughout the year they will offer low mortgage rates on their mortgage revenue bond program. The down payment assistance usually never runs out because you have to pay it back in the form of a second mortgage. It helps a lot of home buyers that want to buy in urban areas that cannot utilizer the USDA program in rural areas. Most of the time the first mortgage is a FHA loan tied with the 2nd mortgage fore down payment assistance.  All KHC programs require a 620 score and rates are locked for 45 days. Max income limits are usually set around $112k for a household with the max loan being $283,000 currently.

 

4. What if I have had a bankruptcy or foreclosure in the past? 

 
FHA and VA are the easiest on previous bankruptcies. FHA and VA both require 2 years removed from the discharge date on a Chapter 7. If you are in the middle of a Chapter 13, FHA will allow for financing with a 12 month clean history payment to the Chapter 13 courts, and with trustee permission.
VA requires 2 years removed from a foreclosure (sheriff sale date of home) and FHA requires 3 years.
USDA requires 3 years removed from both a foreclosure and bankruptcy, but on the foreclosure they do not go off the sale date. This may save you a little time if you had a previous foreclosure.
Fannie Mae (Conventional Loan)
Fannie Mae is by far the strictest. They require 4-7  years out of a foreclosure or bankruptcy
If you have questions about qualifying as first time home buyer in Kentucky, please call, text, email or fill out free prequalification below for your next mortgage loan pre-approval.


The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only.  The posted information does not guarantee approval, nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines.  This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people

via What is the minimum credit score I need to qualify for a Kentucky FHA, VA, USDA and KHC Conventional mortgage loan in 2018?

Credit Scores for Kentucky Mortgages in 2018


via Credit Scores for Kentucky Mortgages21728128_10156505291043998_8057145834609530897_n

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Same day credit pull, 2 different scores


 

Source: Same day credit pull, 2 different scores

 

 

What is the Welcome Home Program?

The Welcome Home Program (WHP) offers grants to fund reasonable down payments and closing costs incurred in conjunction with the acquisition or construction of owner-occupied housing by low- and moderate-income homebuyers. The grants are limited to $5,000 per homebuyer and Members are subject to an aggregate limit of $200,000 per offering. All funds are reserved for specific homebuyers purchasing specific homes and cannot be transferred to other homebuyers or to other homes. Welcome Home funds will be available for reservation on a first-come, first-served basis beginning at 8:00 AM ET on March 1, 2018, and will remain available until all funds have been reserved.

 

Who Can Use the WHP?

The FHLB has established a set-aside of Affordable Housing Program (AHP) funds to help create homeownership. These funds are available to Members as grants to assist their mortgage loan applicants in the home buying process. This is our most widely used program, ideally suited to the needs of community lenders and their customers.

 

What are the Program Requirements?

Below is an abbreviated list of program eligibility requirements:

  • The total income for all occupants must be at or below 80 percent of the Mortgage Revenue Bond (MRB) limit for the county and state where the property is located. The FHLB has an Income and Affordability Workbook to assist in determining household income eligibility.
  • Homebuyers must contribute at least $500 of their own funds towards down payment and/or closing costs.
  • WHP applicants do not have to be first-time homebuyers. However, all first-time homebuyers are required to complete a homeownership counseling program.
  • WHP grant funds are intended only for homebuyers who qualify for the first mortgage based on their own merit. Co-signors and co-borrowers are not allowed unless they will occupy the home as their primary residence and their incomes are included in determining eligibility.
  • WHP grant funds may be used in conjunction with other local, state and federal funding sources and with the FHLB Cincinnati’s Community Investment Cash Advance Programs.
  • The Member who reserves the WHP funds must originate the first loan, but the loan may close in the name of a third party.
  • The interest rate for the first mortgage may not exceed 7.50 percent.
  • The interest rate for the second mortgage may not exceed 11.00 percent.
  • Only second mortgages provided by formal organizations, community development financial institutions, housing finance agencies, non-profit organizations, etc. are acceptable.

All eligible property assisted with WHP funds is subject to a five-year retention mechanism (Retention Agreement), which may require the household to repay all, or a portion, of the subsidy, if the home is sold or refinanced within five years from the closing of the transaction.

 

How Do I Apply?

Information for Homebuyers

Reserving WHP Funds

Homebuyers must apply with one of our Member institutions. Click here to search our Member Directory.

Members may reserve funds via the Welcome Home Program link through the FHLB’s Members Only portal by submitting an online Reservation Request with supporting documentation. Instructions for accessing Members Only may be found here.

The FHLB will perform a preliminary review of the Reservation Request and the documentation submitted to determine eligibility of the homebuyer, availability of funds in the program, and availability of funds for the Member. If any of the information is incomplete, additional documentation or information may be required. Note: The Reservation Request will be denied upon receipt if a fully executed loan application is not included.

Written notification will be provided to the Member as to the homebuyer’s eligibility. Submission of a Reservation Request does not constitute an approval of funds. Funds are reserved only upon written notification of approval from the FHLB.

Please allow four weeks for the FHLB to review the Reservation Request and supporting documentation.

Disbursing WHP Funds

Welcome Home funds will only be disbursed after closing. The FHLB has some general guidance and specific instructions that Members and Closing Agents should use in closing mortgages using Welcome Home funds. Funds will be disbursed only to the extent they are required to fill the gap for down payment, closing costs, and counseling fees.

Members may submit a Request for Payment of Reserved Funding with supporting documentation via the Welcome Home Program link through the FHLB’s Members Only portal. Submission of a Request for Payment of Reserved Funding is not an approval of funds disbursement. Once the Request for Payment of Reserved Funding has been reviewed and approved, funds will be disbursed to the Member.

In the event the FHLB determines that funds were used for an ineligible expense, the grant will be reduced by the amount of the ineligible expense unless the household brings adequate funds to the closing to cover the amount of the ineligible expense. Under no circumstances will cash back to the homebuyer be permitted.

Please allow four to six weeks for the FHLB to review the Request for Payment of Reserved Funding and supporting documentation.

 

Additional Information and Technical Assistance

Documentation requested by the FHLB must be emailed to welcomehome@fhlbcin.com. Any documentation requiring an original signature must be mailed to:

FHLB Cincinnati
Welcome Home Program
P.O. Box 598
Cincinnati, OH 45201-0598

For more information or assistance, please contact the Housing & Community Investment Department at (513) 852- 7680 or toll-free (888) 345-2246 or email us at welcomehome@fhlbcin.com.

For assistance with Members Only, please contact the Service Desk at 800-781-3090.

Credit Karma -“Free” isn’t good, and good isn’t free..


I also pulled one of the reviews from the website…

“I recently used Credit Karma in Canada (where I live) to determine if I would be able to get a mortgage on a new home. My score from them show my credit to be well into the good category at 716. I then approached a company for a mortgage ( I would never have considered this with a bad score). I was contacted within a few hours that my credit score was 618. I asked this company if they had the right name. When I told them my documented score, I was informed that they do not recognize credit Karma’s information. Therefore I find Credit Karma to be useless. I wonder how many others have had doors slammed in their face by this. My wife has not been well and it was very hard on her. Thanks for nothing Credit Karma.”

For my clients, I recommend either Privacy Guard or Credit Check Total to monitor their credit reports and scores.  These sites cost about $20-$30 per month to access/track new credit reports and scores.  This is the least expensive way that I’ve found to obtain new credit reports and scores that we use for our credit repair service.

Privacy Guard uses a “Credit Xpert” score which is fairly similar to a “FICO score” that banks use to risk grade you for a loan.

Credit Check Total uses a “FICO 8” score which is a generic consumer credit score.  This is also very close to a score banks use to grade you.

FICO has designed over 50 different scoring models designed for specific industries (mortgage, auto, credit card, etc..) which will all produce a different 3 digit score ranging from 300-850.  Are you confused yet?

If you’re thinking of applying for a loan/credit, go to MyFICO and purchase all of your FICO scores.  Their cost is about $60 for all your FICO scores.  This will be accurate information that will show you the same scores that the banks will see to approve or deny you.

Share this post with anyone you know that uses Credit Karma!

 

Source: Credit Karma -“Free” isn’t good, and good isn’t free..

 

 

Frequently asked questions about the lending process


Source: Frequently asked questions about the lending process

Where do buyers begin?

Haley Newton, a loan officer with Starkey Mortgage in Sherman, said the first step in the buying process is not finding a house, rather it’s getting prequalified for a home loan. Buyers need to first find out how much house they can afford and if they can actually purchase a home.

“A lot them want to know what the first step is, and many people believe that the first step is finding a house, but that’s actually the second step,” Newton said. “You want to get prequalified with a local lender to know what you’re prequalified for, and then go out and find a house, which is the hard part.”

What documents do buyers need to provide to get prequalified and preapproved?

Prequalification is typically the quick and easy initial step and preapproval is a more involved process. The prequalification process starts with an application, which most lenders have available online, though Newton said buyers can call a lender or meet them in person to fill it out. After buyers fill out an application, which covers the buyers’ finances and history, the lenders will verify the information for preapproval and that requires the supporting documents.

“Once they’re prequalified, we’ll give them a list of documents they need depending on their application,” Newton said.

The list typically calls for pay stubs from the last 30 days, tax returns for the last two years, bank statements for the last two months, W-2s, IDs and Social Security cards.

Jeremy Lewis, branch manager of Grayson Home Loans, said sometimes the lender may require divorce decrees and documentation to indicate other income depending on the buyers’ situation. After preapproval, Lewis said he usually gives the buyers a call, and they figure out a loan program that best fits the buyers.

How much do buyers need for a down payment?

Short answer: It depends on the loan.

Lewis said the down payment is often the main concern for buyers, and it’s not a set amount. Depending on the loan type and what programs the buyers are eligible for, the down payment can be as little as zero down. Loans from the Federal Housing Administration, Veteran Affairs and the U.S. Department of Agriculture each have a set of stipulations that include the percentage required for the down payment.

“It depends on the loan type they’re going with — whether it be a conventional loan, an FHA loan, a VA loan or a USDA loan, it will determine what they’re going to have to place down — what their initial investment is going to be,” Lewis said. “There are still those out there out there that think they have to put 10 to 20 percent down, which is not correct. They can, in certain programs, put as little as zero down.”

Newton said there are down payment assistance programs in the state that can help cover the amount needed. These programs are income based and are capped anywhere from $55,000 to $75,000 depending on the program.

What’s the deal with closing costs?

In addition to a down payment, buyers also need funds to cover the closing costs. Lewis said the closing costs depend on the loan amount as a higher loan amount is going to cost more. About half the closing costs are directed to building the buyers’ escrow account, and the other half is a combination of fees for items such as the title and appraisal.

“Closing costs are another piece of the puzzle they’re going to have to come up with,” Lewis said. “However, in a Texas residential contract, you can ask the sellers to pay a certain percentage, depending on the loan type, for your closing costs.”

Buyers can negotiate with the sellers and ask that the seller pays a portion of the closing costs, which if the buyers qualify for a down payment assistance program, the initial costs can be very low.

“If you’re able to use the down payment assistance programs in addition to requesting the seller to pay some of their closing costs, they can actually get into a home with little to nothing down,” Newton said.

What is an escrow account?

“It kind of works like a separate checking account, and the purpose of that account is to pay the yearly tax bill that comes due every January, and their insurance premium that’s due once a year depending on when they closed on their home,” Newton said.

The initial money put into the escrow account is part of the closing costs, and Lewis said homeowners then add to it monthly when they make their house payments. The account is for buyers to put back money so property taxes and insurance are covered.

“Say when their tax bill comes due in January, there will be plenty of money in the account for them to pay their taxes, so that way they’re not coming up $2 to 3 to 5,000 all at once to pay their tax bill,” Newton said.

Can buyers purchase a home with a bad credit score?

Newton said buyers don’t necessarily need the best credit in order to get a home loan, and she noted that first-time homebuyer programs have recently lowered their credit score requirements.

“A lot people around here they don’t necessarily have bad credit, they just don’t have a lot,” Newton said. “They don’t use their credit.”

Newton said lenders will work with buyers and give them steps to take over 60 to 90 days to boost their credit score to where they can buy a home.

“It can be intimidating but we can walk them through it,” Newton said.

Buyers should consult with local lenders, and Lewis said he guides buyers through the process so they know what to expect.

“There’s so many different moving parts to a loan anymore,” Lewis said. “I try to keep everyone versed and ready for what’s to come in the process and what to expect.”

Joel Lobb
Senior Loan Officer
(NMLS#57916)

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle, Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223

text or call my phone: (502) 905-3708
email me at kentuckyloan@gmail.com

The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only. The posted information does not guarantee approval, nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines. This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the view of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people. NMLS ID# 57916, (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org). Mortgage loans only offered in Kentucky.
All loans and lines are subject to credit approval, verification, and collateral evaluation and are originated by lender. Products and interest rates are subject to change without notice.

Joel E Lobb
American Mortgage
5029053708
email us here

Kentucky FHA, VA, USDA & Rural Housing, KHC and Fannie Mae mortgage loans.

The 23 Questions We Asked at Mortgage Pre-Approval


 

Source: The 23 Questions We Asked at Mortgage Pre-Approval