Tag: Credit Reports

Latest FHA shift to mitigate risks may shut out some Kentucky home buyers wanting FHA Loans in 2019

Latest FHA shift to mitigate risks may shut out some Kentucky home buyers wanting FHA Loans in 2019


via Latest FHA shift to mitigate risks may shut out some Kentucky home buyers wanting FHA Loans in 2019

Latest FHA shift to mitigate risks may shut out some Kentucky home buyers wanting FHA Loans in 2019

Kentucky FHA Loan Changes for FICO Scores and Credit Scores for 2019

 

Last week, the Federal Housing Administration took steps to mitigate risks to its single-family portfolio, announcing updates to its TOTAL Mortgage Scorecard that may flag some loans for manual underwriting.
The change applies to all loans with case numbers assigned on or after March 18th, meaning that it is likely to affect some of the loans currently sitting in an FHA lender’s pipeline.
Chatter among members of the lending community suggests a number of originators are unhappy about the changes, fearing that the end result may be that some of their borrowers will be shut out of FHA financing.
Some said the FHA did not go about implementing the changes the right way, creating confusion about how the risk is being mitigated, while others said they felt as if the rug had been pulled out from under them, and fear that borrowers who no longer qualify will be angry, according to email exchanges between lenders and mortgage brokers, shared with HousingWire.
For its part, the FHA said it is taking necessary steps to address some of the risk trends apparent in its single-family portfolio and flagged as concerning in its 2018 Report to Congress.
Specifically, FHA loans have seen a substantial increase in cash-out refinances, a drop in the average borrower credit score, and an increase in borrowers with high debt-to-income ratios.
In its letter about the Scorecard updates, the FHA said that the number of FHA refinances that are cash-outs increased 60% in 2018, and that almost a quarter of all FHA loans in 2018 had a DTI ratio above 50%.
The average credit scores for FHA borrowers has also declined, falling to 670 in 2018 – the lowest average since 2008.
Combined, these factors are signaling untenable risk for the agency as they flag the potential for the program to drain the Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund.
“Federal Housing Commissioner Montgomery has publicly stated numerous times in recent months that FHA must seek the right balance between managing risk and fulfilling its mission of supporting sustainable home-ownership,” the FHA said in its letter.
“To be successful long term, FHA must maintain the integrity of its insurance endorsements,” it continued. “This includes assessing the causes of the increase in higher-risk credit characteristics in the portfolio and making prudent and necessary changes to re calibrate and adjust its policies as warranted to manage credit risk.”
The agency said the updates to its Scorecard are just the first step it will be taking to address these risk factors.
“FHA will carefully monitor the impact of this change and is preparing to implement additional changes to maintain a better balance of managing risk and fulfilling its mission,” the agency stated.

 

I can answer your questions and usually get you pre-approved the same day. 


Call or Text me at 502-905-3708 with your mortgage questions.
Email Kentuckyloan@gmail.com

Joel Lobb
Mortgage Loan Officer
Individual NMLS ID #57916
 
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle 
Louisville, KY 40223
Company NMLS ID #1364

Text/call:      502-905-3708

fax:            502-327-9119
email:
          kentuckyloan@gmail.com
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.emailmeform.com/builder/form/0bfJs9b6bK8TGoc6mQk9hIu
 
Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer
 
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 | MB73346
 


Text/call 502-905-3708
kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant’s eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant  Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916 http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
 
— Some products and services may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. The content in this marketing advertisement has not been approved, reviewed, sponsored or endorsed by any department or government agency. Rates are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification.

 

What kind of credit score do I need to qualify for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan in 2019?


 What kind of credit score do I need to qualify for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan in 2019?

Credit scores play an important part in getting approved for a Kentucky Mortgage loan. Your credit scores consist of 3 digits and range anywhere from the low-end of 300 to a high score of 800 range on the top-end. Most borrowers are going to fall in the 500, 600, 700 range, with a few in the 300 and 800 ranges.
 The higher the score the better it is for chances of getting approved for a Kentucky Mortgage loan and getting better terms as far as rates, closing costs and mortgage insurance.
There are three main credit bureaus in the United States that lenders will pull from Experian, Equifax, Transunion. Most loan programs will take your middle score. So For example, if you have 629 on transunion, 690 on equifax, and 577 on Experian, your middle credit score would be 629.
The credit score that mortgage lenders use is the fico score. They’re different credit scoring models out there, so keep that in mind, that even though you may get your credit score from Credit Karma or Credit Sesame, this is not your true fico scores that lenders use in Kentucky to approve you for a mortgage loan.
Credit Score vs Credit Karma: what’s the difference?
crekit harma vs credit sesame.jpg

Different Kentucky Home Loan Programs require different credit score requirements. I will discuss each below:

  • Kentucky FHA Mortgage loan credit score requirements:
  • The minimum credit score is 500 for Kentucky FHA loans. However please keep in mind these two things: 1. Lenders credit their own overlays to increase the credit score threshold, most being 620, and secondly, if your credit score is below 580, you would need 10% minimum down payment,  and if the credit score is over 580, then you can go with the minimum 3.5% down payment.
  • Obviously if you have a higher credit score, this will increase your chances of getting approved for a Kentucky FHA Mortgage and possibly better rates and closing costs options.
  • Kentucky VA Mortgage  loans requirements : 
  • VA does not have a minimum credit score requirement, but if the credit score is below 620 few lenders will do the loan, but I am set up with several Kentucky VA lenders where I have closed them down to a 560 credit score, but the borrower had good compensating factors such as: large down payment, low dti ratios, good job history and good residual income with no previous bankruptcies or foreclosures.
  • I would suggest if your credit scores are below 580, I would suggest on working on getting the scores up before you applied for a VA mortgage loan.
  • A lot of lenders will do a rapid rescore which in some cases can increase your credit scores in as little  as 7-10 working days.
  • The federal Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) guarantees loans for current and former members of the military and their families. VA loans provide very favorable terms to eligible borrowers and have limited qualifying requirements. You can get a VA loan with no down payment so long as the home isn’t worth more than you pay for it, and there’s no minimum credit score to qualify. You also don’t have to pay for mortgage insurance, although you do have to pay an up-front funding fee of of between .5% and 3.3% of the loan amount unless you fall within an exception for disabled vets or military widows or widowers.
  • Kentucky USDA Mortgage credit score requirements: 
  • According to their guidelines, USDA will go down to a 580 credit score, but most lenders will want a 640 credit score. USDA uses an online system to underwrite the risk of the loan, and scores under 640 are very difficult to get approved.
  • Validating the Credit Score.  Two or more eligible tradelines are necessary to validate an applicant’s credit report score.  Eligible tradelines consist of credit accounts (revolving, installment etc.) with at least 12 months of repayment history reported on the credit report.  At least one applicant whose income or assets are used for qualification must have a valid credit report score
  • The Rural Housing Service (RHS) operates under the federal Department of Agriculture to guarantee loans for rural home-buyers with limited income who can’t obtain conventional financing. The upside is that Kentucky USDA loans require no down payment. The downside is that they charge a steep up-front fee of 1% of the loan amount (which can be paid off over the entire loan term) and an annual fee of 0.35%.
  • Credit score over 680:  Perform a basic level of underwriting to confirm the applicant has an acceptable credit reputation.  Perform additional analysis if the applicant’s credit history has indicators of unacceptable credit as noted in Paragraph 10.7 of this Chapter.
  • Credit score 679 to 640:  Perform a comprehensive level of underwriting.  Underwrite all aspects of the applicant’s credit history to establish the applicant has an acceptable credit reputation.  Credit scores in this range indicate the applicant’s reputation is uncertain and will require a thorough analysis by the underwriter of the credit to draw a logical conclusion about the applicant’s commitment to making payments on the new mortgage obligation.  The applicant’s credit history should demonstrate his or her past willingness and ability to meet credit obligations.
  • Credit score less than 640:  Perform a cautious level of underwriting.  Perform a detailed review of all aspects of the applicant’s credit history to establish the applicant’s willingness to repay and ability to manage obligations as agreed.  Unless there are extenuating circumstances documented in accordance with this Chapter, a credit score in this range is generally viewed as a strong indication that the applicant does not have an acceptable credit reputation.
  • Little or no credit history: The lack of credit history on the credit report may be mitigated if the applicant can document a willingness to pay recurring debts through other acceptable means such as third party verifications or cancelled checks. Due to impartiality issues, third party verifications from relatives of household members are not permissible.   Lenders can develop a Non-Traditional Credit Report for applicants who do not have a credit score in accordance with Paragraph 10.6 of this Chapter
Kentucky Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac Conventional Credit Score Requirements
These are considered “conventional loans’ that can be often be obtained with a 3% to 5% down payment. Of course, there are higher standards for conventional home financing. The most common minimum credit score requirement to get approved today is a 620 FICO. This type of score is typical for people that have high credit card balances or a few delinquent payments in their past. The general consensus on Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae loans in Kentucky is that a 620 score is the entry-point to qualify, but you will need a thorough documentation of income with credit scores in the 620 to 640 range. You will have a better shot to be approved for a mortgage backed by Fannie or Freddie with a 680-credit score and less strenuous underwriting.
  • Competitive Mortgage Rates and Fees
  • Monthly Mortgage Insurance Is Not Always Required
  • Ideal for First Time Home Buyers with Good Credit
Common Misconceptions About Credit Scoring
Credit scoring is a mystery to many and it even surprises us occasionally.  Below are examples of common misconceptions we hear all the time
If I pay off my balance every month so it should show a zero balance on my credit report:  Wrong!
Credit card companies will usually report your ending balance on your monthly statement. So even if you pay off your credit card every month, it will not show a zero balance on credit. A bad scenario for someone’s score would be the following: Credit limit is $1,000 and the card owner charges $900 but pays off the balance once the statement is received. The card will report a $900 balance that is 90% of the credit limit and that will hurt the credit score as 30% of a credit score is balance compared to credit limits as a percentage.
I will lower my credit limits to make my credit look better.  Wrong!
Do not put your credit limits too low! Again, 30% of your score is balance compared to credit limits. For instance if you charge $1000 per month on a $10,000 limit card, the balance is 10% of the limit which is very good. On the other hand, if you lower the limit to $1500, the balance is 67% of the limit which hurts the credit score.
I will close my credit cards to help my credit report.  Wrong!  most of the time
Having a good mix of credit types is very important to have a great credit score. I will say this again, 30% of the score is balance compared to credit limits on revolving accounts and if someone doesn’t have any open cards, then a lot of points are being lost on a score. Most experts say that having 2 or 3 revolving accounts that report to all 3 bureaus with low balances compared to the limits is the magic number for the best score. Also a portion of the credit score is how long accounts are open so keep the lines of credit open a very long time rather than opening and then closing accounts often
What if underwriting will require me to pay off a collection to approve my loan, Am I stuck?  No
Then all you need to do is simply have to do it have it as a condition to pay off the collection at closing rather than up-front.  By doing this, it will not have time to lower your credit score before closing your loan.
I haven’t paid my student loans in years because they are in collection status, but that was a long time ago so I’m ok, right?  No
Unfortunately if they are government backed loans, then this will affect your ability to obtain a government mortgage loan.  A good thing about government student loans is that they will usually allow you to start paying them again, then usually within 6 – 12 months, they will report the loan again as current.  Make sure that the company agrees to do this and get it in writing.  By doing this, you can go from owing Thousands of dollars as a collection to having a regular loan with hopefully a manageable payment.
I just got a car loan, so my credit should be good.  Not necessarily
I hate to say it, but about anyone can get a car loan no matter how bad the credit is so this is not an indication of good credit. Having an installment loan like a car loan is a good thing to have on credit as long as it is paid on time and the longer it has reported, the better. As a side note, be wary of buying a car and the dealership pulling your credit without your knowledge to many creditors. It is not uncommon for someone with marginal or sometimes good credit to have their credit pulled 10 times or more.
I will pay off my old collections just before applying for a mortgage so my scores will go up.  Usually your scores will go down unless they agree to “delete” or “remove” them from your credit in writing
Be careful here! If there are older collections with a date of last activity that is a while back and they are paid off, the credit scores can go down in the short term. So if someone has a 650 credit score which would qualify for most mortgages, wants to increase their scores a little by paying off old collections just before purchasing a home, the collections would now show paid off (if they actually update which they often don’t), but now show a date of last activity as “now”. It doesn’t make sense but the bureaus treat the collection activity like it just happened which doesn’t seem right but it happens. Often it makes more sense to pay off the collections at or prior to closing following the recommendation of the loan officer.  Fair Isaac is working on potential changes to how this affects scores and maybe the other credit bureaus will make this change too.
Charged off accounts and collections are treated the same when getting a mortgage, right?  Actually NO
Sometimes when an account is charged off, it is not required to be paid off for qualifying purposes.  This is true on FHA loans for instance.
I will dispute some credit accounts on my credit report so my scores will go up.
Read the article below on how dispute language can hurt you when applying for a mortgage.
If you want a personalized answer for your unique situation call, text, or email me or visit my website below:

Joel Lobb
Mortgage Loan Officer

Individual NMLS ID #57916

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle 
Louisville, KY 40223
Company NMLS ID #1364

Text/call: 502-905-3708

email: kentuckyloan@gmail.com

If you are an individual with disabilities who needs accommodation, or you are having difficulty using our website to apply for a loan, please contact us at 502-905-3708.
Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant’s eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant  Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
— Some products and services may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. The content in this marketing advertisement has not been approved, reviewed, sponsored or endorsed by any department or government agency. Rates are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification.

 

What is the minimum credit score I need to qualify for a Kentucky mortgage in 2018?


via What is the minimum credit score I need to qualify for a Kentucky FHA, VA, USDA and KHC Conventional mortgage loan in 2018?

Welcome Home Grant Kentucky $50 for 2019


What is the Welcome Home Program?

The Welcome Home Program (WHP) offers grants to fund reasonable down payments and closing costs incurred in conjunction with the acquisition or construction of owner-occupied housing by low- and moderate-income homebuyers. The grants are limited to $5,000 per homebuyer and Members are subject to an aggregate limit of $200,000 per offering. All funds are reserved for specific homebuyers purchasing specific homes and cannot be transferred to other homebuyers or to other homes. Welcome Home funds will be available for reservation on a first-come, first-served basis beginning at 8:00 AM ET on March 1, 2018, and will remain available until all funds have been reserved.

 

Who Can Use the WHP?

The FHLB has established a set-aside of Affordable Housing Program (AHP) funds to help create homeownership. These funds are available to Members as grants to assist their mortgage loan applicants in the home buying process. This is our most widely used program, ideally suited to the needs of community lenders and their customers.

 

What are the Program Requirements?

Below is an abbreviated list of program eligibility requirements:

  • The total income for all occupants must be at or below 80 percent of the Mortgage Revenue Bond (MRB) limit for the county and state where the property is located. The FHLB has an Income and Affordability Workbook to assist in determining household income eligibility.
  • Homebuyers must contribute at least $500 of their own funds towards down payment and/or closing costs.
  • WHP applicants do not have to be first-time homebuyers. However, all first-time homebuyers are required to complete a homeownership counseling program.
  • WHP grant funds are intended only for homebuyers who qualify for the first mortgage based on their own merit. Co-signors and co-borrowers are not allowed unless they will occupy the home as their primary residence and their incomes are included in determining eligibility.
  • WHP grant funds may be used in conjunction with other local, state and federal funding sources and with the FHLB Cincinnati’s Community Investment Cash Advance Programs.
  • The Member who reserves the WHP funds must originate the first loan, but the loan may close in the name of a third party.
  • The interest rate for the first mortgage may not exceed 7.50 percent.
  • The interest rate for the second mortgage may not exceed 11.00 percent.
  • Only second mortgages provided by formal organizations, community development financial institutions, housing finance agencies, non-profit organizations, etc. are acceptable.

All eligible property assisted with WHP funds is subject to a five-year retention mechanism (Retention Agreement), which may require the household to repay all, or a portion, of the subsidy, if the home is sold or refinanced within five years from the closing of the transaction.

 

How Do I Apply?

Information for Homebuyers

Reserving WHP Funds

Homebuyers must apply with one of our Member institutions. Click here to search our Member Directory.

Members may reserve funds via the Welcome Home Program link through the FHLB’s Members Only portal by submitting an online Reservation Request with supporting documentation. Instructions for accessing Members Only may be found here.

The FHLB will perform a preliminary review of the Reservation Request and the documentation submitted to determine eligibility of the homebuyer, availability of funds in the program, and availability of funds for the Member. If any of the information is incomplete, additional documentation or information may be required. Note: The Reservation Request will be denied upon receipt if a fully executed loan application is not included.

Written notification will be provided to the Member as to the homebuyer’s eligibility. Submission of a Reservation Request does not constitute an approval of funds. Funds are reserved only upon written notification of approval from the FHLB.

Please allow four weeks for the FHLB to review the Reservation Request and supporting documentation.

Disbursing WHP Funds

Welcome Home funds will only be disbursed after closing. The FHLB has some general guidance and specific instructions that Members and Closing Agents should use in closing mortgages using Welcome Home funds. Funds will be disbursed only to the extent they are required to fill the gap for down payment, closing costs, and counseling fees.

Members may submit a Request for Payment of Reserved Funding with supporting documentation via the Welcome Home Program link through the FHLB’s Members Only portal. Submission of a Request for Payment of Reserved Funding is not an approval of funds disbursement. Once the Request for Payment of Reserved Funding has been reviewed and approved, funds will be disbursed to the Member.

In the event the FHLB determines that funds were used for an ineligible expense, the grant will be reduced by the amount of the ineligible expense unless the household brings adequate funds to the closing to cover the amount of the ineligible expense. Under no circumstances will cash back to the homebuyer be permitted.

Please allow four to six weeks for the FHLB to review the Request for Payment of Reserved Funding and supporting documentation.

 

Additional Information and Technical Assistance

Documentation requested by the FHLB must be emailed to welcomehome@fhlbcin.com. Any documentation requiring an original signature must be mailed to:

FHLB Cincinnati
Welcome Home Program
P.O. Box 598
Cincinnati, OH 45201-0598

For more information or assistance, please contact the Housing & Community Investment Department at (513) 852- 7680 or toll-free (888) 345-2246 or email us at welcomehome@fhlbcin.com.

For assistance with Members Only, please contact the Service Desk at 800-781-3090.

 

 

 

Kentucky Welcome Home Grant $5000

Source: Same day credit pull, 2 different scores

 

 

 

Credit Karma -“Free” isn’t good, and good isn’t free..


I also pulled one of the reviews from the website…

“I recently used Credit Karma in Canada (where I live) to determine if I would be able to get a mortgage on a new home. My score from them show my credit to be well into the good category at 716. I then approached a company for a mortgage ( I would never have considered this with a bad score). I was contacted within a few hours that my credit score was 618. I asked this company if they had the right name. When I told them my documented score, I was informed that they do not recognize credit Karma’s information. Therefore I find Credit Karma to be useless. I wonder how many others have had doors slammed in their face by this. My wife has not been well and it was very hard on her. Thanks for nothing Credit Karma.”

For my clients, I recommend either Privacy Guard or Credit Check Total to monitor their credit reports and scores.  These sites cost about $20-$30 per month to access/track new credit reports and scores.  This is the least expensive way that I’ve found to obtain new credit reports and scores that we use for our credit repair service.

Privacy Guard uses a “Credit Xpert” score which is fairly similar to a “FICO score” that banks use to risk grade you for a loan.

Credit Check Total uses a “FICO 8” score which is a generic consumer credit score.  This is also very close to a score banks use to grade you.

FICO has designed over 50 different scoring models designed for specific industries (mortgage, auto, credit card, etc..) which will all produce a different 3 digit score ranging from 300-850.  Are you confused yet?

If you’re thinking of applying for a loan/credit, go to MyFICO and purchase all of your FICO scores.  Their cost is about $60 for all your FICO scores.  This will be accurate information that will show you the same scores that the banks will see to approve or deny you.

Share this post with anyone you know that uses Credit Karma!

 

Source: Credit Karma -“Free” isn’t good, and good isn’t free..

 

 

BREAKING NEWS!! You can now get your mortgage FICO score online!


BREAKING NEWS!! You can now get your mortgage FICO score online!.

FICO Makes Additional FICO Score Versions Available to Consumers for the First Time

 

Americans can view all the most commonly used FICO Score versions for mortgage, auto and credit card lending

 

Obtaining new financing after a Short Sale or Foreclosure for a Kentucky USDA, FHA, VA, and Fannie Mae Loan


Obtaining new financing after a Short Sale or Foreclosure for a Kentucky USDA, FHA, VA, and Fannie Mae Loan.

FICO Scores and Your Mortgage: How to Bump Your FICO Score to Secure a Better Mortgage Rate


FICO Scores and Your Mortgage: How to Bump Your FICO Score to Secure a Better Mortgage Rate.

The Best Kind of Loan for Your Credit Score


The Best Kind of Loan for Your Credit Score.

How To Improve Your FICO Score


How To Improve Your FICO Score.