Kentucky FHA Loan Guidelines


hud-100-incentive-program-fha-home-loan-group-1gdsgdsgdfgdHere is my Top 5 List for getting a Kentucky FHA Mortgage Loan: 1.A Low Down Payment –  Kentucky FHA Mortgage Loans only require a 3.5% down payment. And what makes that even more attractive is tha…

Source: Kentucky FHA Loan Guidelines

 

FHA Guidelines: How to Qualify for an FHA Loan

The first step to qualifying for an FHA loan is to work with a loan officer at an FHA approved lender. General FHA guidelines that the loan officer will discuss with you include:

  • Documenting an employment history over the last two years. FHA guidelines consider the last two years of employment and look at a steady pay history or employment with the same employer.
  • Providing a valid social security number and proof that you’re a resident of the United States. There are exceptions for resident aliens, but these exceptions will vary by lender.
  • Producing the necessary down payment. FHA loans require a minimum down payment of 3.5% when buying a home — but the down payment may be a gift under certain conditions.
  • Performing the necessary due diligence. The property will need to be inspected by an FHA appraiser and an FHA approved appraisal must be done.
  • Assessing how much you can afford. Although there is some flexibility, the total monthly mortgage payment generally should not exceed 30-32% of your gross monthly income.
  • Assessing your level of debt. Your total debt should not be more than 43% of your gross monthly income. Again, there is some flexibility with this number, but this is a good guideline.
    • Note from mortgage professional, Albert Bui, “the 43% DTI to income is mainly a guideline max for many loans out on the market to comply with certain qualified mortgages (QM) guidelines however in reality the max on FHA I’ve seen is 46.99% on the front ratio (housing payment only) and 56.99% on the backend when factoring in all other obligations. So this means you can borrow up to 46.99% on the front ratio for your housing payment but it doesn’t mean the borrower should max it out, rather they “can.”
  • Knowing your credit score. Minimum credit scores now apply with FHA loans and can vary by lender. A credit score of 580 and above requires a 3.5% down payment, and a credit score of 500-579 requires a 10% down payment. Credit score requirements will vary by lender.
    • According to Mr. Bui, “a 3.5% down payment is the min however there are many down payment assistance (DPA) programs that will either grant you the 3.5% for free with no repayment’s, offer the borrower a 3.5% community 2nd loan that is silent (no payment) and may be forgivable after a certain period of time, or a 2nd that has a silent payment but is due at a certain period of time or payoff in the future. So you can bring in as little as $0.00 with qualifying income or additional requirements.”
  • Disclosing prior bankruptcies. If you have had a bankruptcy that has been discharged, the waiting period is 2 years.
  • Disclosing prior foreclosures. If you have had a foreclosure, the waiting period is 3 years, and you must have good credit

https://www.biggerpockets.com/users/Fin_savvy

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Credit Scores Needed To Qualify For A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval?


 

 

Credit Scores Needed To Qualify For A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval
Credit Scores Needed To Qualify For A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval

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Credit Scores Needed To Qualify For A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval

Source: Credit Scores Needed To Qualify For A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval?

Zero Down Mortgages In Kentucky ? Yes, With The Kentucky Rural HousingUSDA Home Loan


Zero Down Mortgage?  Yes, With The USDA Home Loan As a loan originator, I get lots of questions from home buyers and Realtors about 100% financing. After the recent home mortgage meltdown crisis, n…

Source: Zero Down Mortgage? Yes, With The USDA Home Loan

August 11, 2016

Funding is Available for your SFH Guaranteed Applications!

As we enter the last two months of Fiscal Year (FY) 2016, Rural Development is pleased to announce that USDA has more than $10 billion available to guarantee no-down payment loans for your rural customers through our Single Family Housing Guaranteed Program. 

Today’s low interest rate environment, coupled with new program features such as the single-close construction loan and the streamlined-assist refinance option, makes this a great opportunity for rural Americans!  Please visit our SFH Guarantee website or contact a Guaranteed Loan Specialist for more information!

Thank you for your support of the Single Family Housing Guaranteed Loan Program!  We are proud to partner with you to serve the rural homebuyers of America.

 

Louisville Mortgage Underwriting Guidelines


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Source: Louisville Mortgage Underwriting Guidelines

Louisville Mortgage mortgage underwriting guidelines will help you understand your loan options when purchasing or refinacing a home. Now that you have found your dream house, you are going to need to apply for a Louisville Mortgage mortgage loan. Your realtor will either recommend a banking institution or you may already have one in mind. You will be dealing with a loan officer who will be compiling all the data on you to see if you qualify for a loan to pay for this house. All lending institutions have different Underwriting Guildelines set in place when reviewing a borrower’s financial history to determine the likelihood of receiving on-time payments. The primary items reviewed are:

Income

Income is one of the most important variables a lender will examine because it is used to repay the loan. Income is reviewed for the type of work, length of employment, educational training required, and opportunity for advancement. An underwriter will look at the source of income and the likelihood of its continuance to arrive at a gross monthly figure.

Salary and Hourly Wages – Calculated on a gross monthly basis, prior to income tax deductions.

Part-time and Second Job Income – Not usually considered unless it is in place for 12 to 24 straight months. Lenders view part-time income as a strong compensating factor.

Commission, Bonus and Overtime Income – Can only be used if received for two previous years. Further, an employer must verify that it is likely to continue. A 24-month average figure is used.

Retirement and Social Security Income – Must continue for at least three years into the future to be considered. If it is tax free, it can be grossed up to an equivalent gross monthly figure. Multiply the net amount by 1.20%.

Alimony and Child Support Income – Must be received for the 12 previous months and continue for the next 36 months. Lenders will require a divorce decree and a court printout to verify on-time payments.

Notes Receivable, Interest, Dividend and Trust Income – Proof of receiving funds for 12 previous months is required. Documentation showing income due for 3 more years is also necessary.Rental Income – Cannot come from a Primary Residence roommate. The only acceptable source is from an investment property. A lender will use 75% of the monthly rent and subtract ownership expenses. The Schedule E of a tax return is used to verify the figures. If a home rented recently, a copy of a current month-to-month lease is acceptable.

Automobile Allowance and Expense Account Reimbursements – Verified with 2 years tax returns and reduced by actual expenses listed on the income tax return Schedule C.

Education Expense Reimbursements – Not considered income. Only viewed as slight compensating factor.

Self Employment Income – Lenders are very careful in reviewing self-employed borrowers. Two years minimum ownership is necessary because two years is considered a representative sample. Lenders use a 2-year average monthly income figure from the Adjusted Gross Income on the tax returns. A lender may also add back additional income for depreciation and one-time capital expenses. Self-employed borrowers often have difficulty qualifying for a mortgage due to large expense write offs. A good solution to this challenge used to be the No Income Verification Loan, but there are very few of these available any more given the tightened lending standards in the current economy. NIV loan programs can be studied in the Mortgage Program section of the library.

Debt

An applicant’s liabilities are reviewed for cash flow. Lenders need to make sure there is enough income for the proposed mortgage payment, after other revolving and installment debts are paid.

  • All loans, leases, and credit cards are factored into the debt calculation. Utilities, insurance, food, clothing, schooling, etc. are not.
  • If a loan has less than 10 months remaining, a lender will usually disregard it.
  • The minimum monthly payment listed on a credit card bill is the figure used, not the payment made.
  • An applicant who co-borrowed for a friend or relative is accountable for the payment. If the applicant can show 12 months of on-time cancelled checks from the co-borrowee, the debt will not count.
  • Loans can be paid off to qualify for a mortgage, but credit cards sometimes cannot (varies by lender). The reasoning is that if the credit card is paid off, the credit line still exists and the borrower can run up debt after the loan is closed.
  • A borrower with fewer liabilities is thought to demonstrate superior cash management skills.

Credit History

Most lenders require a residential merged credit report (RMCR) from the 3 main credit bureaus: Trans Union, Equifax, andExperian. They will order one report which is a blending of all three credit bureaus and is easier to read than the individual reports. This “blended” credit report also searches public records for liens, judgments, bankruptcies and foreclosures. See ourcredit report index.

Credit report in hand, an underwriter studies the applicant’s credit to determine the likelihood of receiving an on-time mortgage payment. Many studies have shown that past performance is a reflection of future expectations. Hence, most lenders now use a national credit scoring system, typically the FICO score, to evaluate credit risk. If you’re worried about credit scoring see our articles on it.

The mortgage lending process, once very forgiving, has tightened lending standards considerably. A person with excellent credit, good stability, and sufficient documentable income to make the payments comfortably will usually qualify for an “A” paper loan. “A Paper”, or conforming loans, make up the majority of loans in the U.S. and are loans that must conform to the guidelines set by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac in order to be saleable by the lender. Such loans must meet established and strict requirements regarding maximum loan amount, downpayment amount, borrower income and credit requirements and suitable properties. Loans that do not meet the credit and/or income requirements of conforming “A-paper” loans are known as non-conforming loans and are often referred to as “B”, “C” and “D” paper loans depending on the borrower’s credit history and financial capacity.

Here are some rules of thumb most lenders follow:

  • 12 plus months positive credit will usually equal an A paperloan program, depending on the overall credit. FHA loans usually follow this guideline more often than conventional loans.
  • Unpaidcollections, judgments and charge offs must be paid prior to closing an A paper loan. The only exception is if the debt was due to the death of a primary wage earner, or the bill was a medical expense.
  • If a borrower has negotiated an acceptable payment plan, and has made on time payments for 6 to 12 months, a lender may not require a debt to be paid off prior to closing.
  • Credit items usually are reported for 7 years. Bankruptcies expire after 10 years.
  • Foreclosure – 5 years from the completion date. From the fifth to seventh year following the foreclosure completion date, the purchase of a principal residence is permitted with a minimum 10% down and 680 FICO score. The purchase of a second or investment property is not permitted for 7 years. Limited cash out refinances are permitted for all occupancy types.
  • Pre-foreclosure (Short Sale) – 2 years from the completion date (no exceptions or extenuating circumstances).
  • Deed-in-Lieu of Foreclosure – 4 year period from the date the deed-in-lieu is executed. From the fifth to the seventh year following the execution date the borrower may purchase a property secured by a principal residence, second home or investment property with the greater of 10 percent minimum down payment or the minimum down payment required for the transaction. Limited cash out and cash out refinance transactions secured by a principal residence, second home or investment property are permitted pursuant to the eligibility requirements in effect at that time.
  • Chapter 7 Bankruptcy – A borrower is eligible for an A paper loan program 4 years after discharge or dismissal, provided they have reestablished credit and have maintained perfect credit after the bankruptcy.
  • Chapter 13 Bankruptcy – 2 years from the discharge date or 4 years from the dismissal date.
  • Multiple Bankruptcies– 5 years from the most recent dismissal or discharge date for borrowers with more than one filing in the past 7 years.
  • The good credit of a co-borrowerdoes not offset the bad credit of a borrower.
  • Credit scores usually range from 400 to 800. Changes to lending standards are occurring on a daily basis as a result of tightening lending standards, and can vary from lender-to-lender– so this information should be considered simply a guideline. For conforming loans, most lenders will lend down to a FICO of 620, with additional rate hits for the lower-end credit scores and loan-to-values. When you are borrowing more than 80%, they typically will not lend if you have a FICO below 680. The FHA/VA program just changed their minimum required FICO to 620, unless you are qualifying a borrower with non-traditional credit. The few non-conforming loan programs that are still available typically require 30% down payment with a minimum FICO of 700 for self-employed and 650 for W-2 employees, and the loan-to-value will change with the loan amount.
  • A credit score below 600 may require an Alternative Credit mortgage program.
  • Misinformation on a credit report can be repaired! For more information see our credit repairsection.
  • The FTC states, “Credit repair companies take your money and vanish.” Anything a credit repair company does for a fee, a consumer can do for free. Be wary of these guys!
  • If a borrower falls behind on a payment, the creditor should be contacted as quickly as possible. Most creditors will work with a borrower who makes an initial good faith effort to communicate with them.

Savings

Lenders evaluate savings for three reasons.

  1. The more money a borrower has after closing, the greater the probability of on-time payments.
  2. Most loan programs require a minimum borrower contribution.
  3. Lenders want to know that people have invested their own into the house, making it less likely that they will walk away from their life’s savings. They analyze savings documents to insure the applicant did not borrow the funds or receive a gift.

Lenders look at the following types of accounts and assets for down payment funds:

Checking and Savings – 90 days seasoning in a bank account is required for these funds.Gifts and Grants – After a borrower’s minimum contribution, a gifts or grant is permitted.

Sale of Assets – Personal property can be sold for the required contribution. The property should be appraised and a bill of sale is required. Also, a copy of the received check and a deposit slip are needed.

Secured Loans – A loan secured by property is also an acceptable source of closing funds.

IRA, 401K, Keogh & SEP – Any amount that can be accessed is an acceptable source of funds.

Sweat Equity and Cash On Hand – Generally not acceptable. FHA programsallow it in special circumstances.

Sale Of Previous Home – Must close prior to new home for the funds to be used. A lender will ask for a listing contract, sales contract, or HUD 1 closing statement.

Debt vs Income Ratio

The percentage of one’s debt to income is one of the most important factors when underwriting a loan. Lenders have determined that a house payment should not exceed approximately 30% of Gross Monthly Income. Gross Monthly Income is income before taxes are taken out. Furthermore, a house payment plus minimum monthly revolving and installment debt should be less than 40% of Gross Monthly Income (this figure varies from 35%-41% contingent on the source of financing).

Example

An applicant has $4,500 gross monthly income. The maximum mortgage payment is:

$4500 X .30 = $1350

Their total debts come to:

$500 Car
$20 Visa
$30 Sears
$75 Master Card
—————-
$625 per month.

Remember, their total debts (mortgage plus other debts) must be less than or equal to 40% of their gross monthly income.

$2,800 X .40 = $1800

$1800 is the maximum debt the borrower can have, debts and mortgage payments combined. Can the borrower keep all their debts and have the maximum mortgage payment allowed? NO!

In this case, the borrower, since they have high debts, must adjust the maximum mortgage payment downward, because:

$625 debts
$1350 mortgage
————–
$1975 – which is more than the $1800 (40% of gross debt) we calculated above.

The maximum mortgage payment is therefore:

$1800 – $625 (monthly debt) = $1175.

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2016 Kentucky Home Buyers Mortgage Guide After Foreclosures and Short Sales For FHA, VA, Fannie Mae, USDA, RHS


2016 Kentucky  mortgage waiting period for foreclosures and short sales for specific situations

Homebuyers are Ready to Buy After Foreclosures and Short Sales

Kentucky Conventional Loans

  • Foreclosures: 7 years from the foreclosure completion date (some applicants may qualify for a conventional loan only 3 years after with extenuating conditions including wage earner death, illness or job loss)
  • Short Sale/Deed in Lieu-Short Sale:
    • 7 year with less than 10% down of primary residence
    • 4 years with 10% down on the purchase of a primary residence
    • 4 years with 20% down on the purchase of a primary, secondary or investment property purchase
    • 2 years with extenuating circumstances, only with 20% down

Kentucky FHA Loans

  • Foreclosures: 3 years from the foreclosure completion date and transferred back to the lender to the credit report date
  • Short Sale: 3 years from the title transfer date

 

Kentucky VA Loans

  • Foreclosure: 2 years from foreclosure completion date and date transferred back to the lender
  • Short Sale: 2 years from previous sale closed date and new owner transfer date

 

Kentucky USDA Loans

** If the mortgage debt that was foreclosed, was included in a Bankruptcy – then the KY USDA Home Loan waiting periods after foreclosure “waiting period” of 3 years, starts from the date of the discharge of the Bankruptcy.  Because it can take 6 months or more for Banks to process the Foreclosure, and transfer title, this is a tremendous plus.

 

:    3 years from foreclosure completion date or sheriff sale of home

:    3 years from short-sale closing date

 

Homebuyers are Ready to Buy After Foreclosures and Short Sales

BREAKING NEWS!! You can now get your mortgage FICO score online!


BREAKING NEWS!! You can now get your mortgage FICO score online!.

FICO Makes Additional FICO Score Versions Available to Consumers for the First Time

 

Americans can view all the most commonly used FICO Score versions for mortgage, auto and credit card lending

 

Kentucky FHA PMI Changes for 2015


Kentucky FHA PMI Changes for 2015

via Kentucky FHA PMI Changes for 2015.

 

The FHA Mortgage Insurance Premium (MIP) Refund chart