What Credit Score do You Need to qualify for a FHA VA KHC USDA Kentucky Mortgage


 

What Credit Score do You Need to Buy a Home?

Call me today for a free credit report–502-905-3708 or email me at kentuckyloan@gmail.com

When it comes to mortgages and credit scores, there are two really important questions to ask:

–What credit score do I need to qualify for a mortgage?

–What credit score do I need to get the lowest interest rate on a mortgage?

These different but related questions are important if you are looking to buy a home. And the second question is particularly important. With a high FICO score, you can literally save tens of thousands of dollars in interest over the life of a home loan. So let’s take a look at both questions. And if you don’t know you score, be sure to get you free credit score.

What credit score do you need to qualify for a mortgage?

The first thing to keep in mind is that qualifying for a mortgage involves a lot more than just a credit score. While your FICO score is a very important ingredient, it is just one factor. Lenders also look at your income and level of debt, among other things.

As a rule of thumb, however, a credit score below 620 will make buying a home very difficult. A FICO score below 620 is considered sub-prime. In the past there were mortgage companies that specialized in sub-prime mortgages. Because of the challenges in the credit market over the last year or so, however, sub-prime loans have become difficult if not impossible to obtain.

A FICO score between 620 and 650 is considered fair to good credit. But keep in mind, this range of credit scores does not guarantee you will qualify for a mortgage, and if you do qualify, it won’t get you the lowest interest rate possible. Still, to buy a home aim for a score of at least 620, recognizing that other factors weigh in the decision and that some banks may require a higher score.

What credit score do you need to get a low rate mortgage?

It use to be that a score of about 720 would yield the lowest mortgage rates available. Today, the best rates kick in with a FICO score of 760. And interest rates go up significantly as your credit score drops. To give you an idea, the following table shows current rates by credit score and calculates a monthly principal and interest payment based on a $300,000 loan:

Eligibility Requirements  for a Kentucky  FHA Loan after September 15, 2015

When applying for eligibility for A Kentucky  FHA Loans, There are some factors taken into account:
  • Credit score 620 and above with the mortgage investors we work with, even though FHA will insured lower credit scores, most mortgage lenders will create overlays
  • No bankruptcies (Chapter 7) in last 2 years with clean credit afterwards and 3 years after a foreclosure or short sale
  • 3.5% Down payment. Can be gifted or money saved-up or money taken out of 401k or retirement account. No cash gifts or unsourced deposits are allowed for down payment on a FHA loan.
  • Debt to income ratios can be up to 55% on an Approved Eligible Files but restricted on manual underwrites to 31% and 43% respectively.
  • Overtime or bonus income needs to show a 2 year history for it be eligible for income qualifying on a FHA loan. FHA underwriters typically will take a 2 year average.
  • FHA appraisals with the new changes now call for the FHA appraiser to check and review the home more thoroughly, hence the typical costs of a FHA appraisal has gone from $325 to $425 due to more legwork involved on a FHA appraisal.
  • Any disputes on credit bureau will need to be taken out of dispute status typically for your credit scores to be validated, so please be aware of this.
  • Rent references are usually not called for unless your file get downgraded to a manual
  • FHA mortgage insurance the upfront and annual mi monthly fee is for life of loan.
  • A lender may approve a borrower if:  acceptable payment history and  no major derogatory credit on revolving accounts in the last 12 months. “Acceptable payment history” means:  the borrower made all housing and installment debt payments on time for the previous 12 months, and  there are no more than two 30‐day late mortgage or installment payments in the last 24 months. “Major derogatory credit” means:  payments made more than 90 days after the due date, or  3 or more payments made more than 60 days after the due date.
  •  Child support income is Allowed If using a voluntary payment agreement, the lender:  obtains 12 months canceled checks, deposit slips, or tax returns.  For divorce decree, legal separation agreement, or court order if there is evidence of receipt for the most recent 6 months, may use the current payment to calculate income, &  if there are not 6 months of consistent payments, may average the income received over the prior 2 years, or less if the income has not been received that long  4000.1 II.A



Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer
(NMLS#57916)
text or call my phone: (502) 905-3708
email me at kentuckyloan@gmail.com
The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only. The posted information does not guarantee approval, nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines. This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the view of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people. NMLS ID# 57916, (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org). Mortgage loans only offered in Kentucky.
All loans and lines are subject to credit approval, verification, and collateral evaluation and are originated by lender. Products and interest rates are subject to change without notice. Manufactured and mobile homes are not eligible as collateral.
Co-branded Daily Rate Report for:
joel lobb
Louisville Mortgage Group
License:  NMLS# 57916
I specialize in Kentucky FHA, VA, USDA, KHC, Jumbo and Fannie Mae mortgage loans in Ky. I have helped over 589 Kentucky families buy their first home and refinance their current mortgage for a lower rate; For the first time buyer with little money …view more
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Refinance your Kentucky Mortgage Loan


If you are a homeowner who was lucky enough to buy when Kentucky mortgage rates were low, you may have no interest in refinancing your present loan. Perhaps you bought your home when rates were higher. Or perhaps you have an adjustable rate loan and would like to obtain different terms.

Should could you refinance your  Kentucky Mortgage Loan? This page will answer some questions that may help you decide. If you do refinance, the process will remind you of what you went through in obtaining the original mortgage. That’s because, in reality, refinancing a mortgage is simply taking out a new mortgage. You will encounter many of the same procedures and the same types of costs the second time around.

Would Refinancing your Kentucky Mortgage loan Be Worth It?

Refinancing can be worth while, but it does not make good financial sense for everyone. A general rule is that refinancing becomes worth your while if the current interest rate on your mortgage is at least two percentage points higher than the prevailing market rate. This figure is generally accepted as the safe margin when balancing the costs of refinancing a mortgage against the savings.

There are other considerations, too. Such as how long you plan to stay in the house. Most sources say it takes at least three years to realize fully the savings from a lower interest rate, given the costs of the refinancing. (Depending on your loan amount and the particular circumstances, however, you might choose to refinance a loan that is only 1.0 percentage points higher then the current rate. You may even find you could recoup the refinancing costs in a shorter time.)

Refinancing can be a good idea for homeowners who:

  • Want to take advantage of lower rates. This is a good idea only if you intend to stay in the house long enough to make the additional fees worthwhile.
  • Have an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) and want a fixed-rate loan, to have the certainty of knowing exactly what the mortgage payment will be for the life of the loan.
  • Want to convert to an ARM with a lower interest rate or more protective features (such as a better rate and payment caps) than the ARM they currently have.
  • Want to build up equity more quickly by converting to a loan with a shorter term.
  • Want to draw on the equity built up in their house to get cash for a major purchase or for their children’s education.

If you decide that refinancing is not worth the costs, ask your lender whether you may be able to obtain all or some of the new terms you want by agreeing to a modification of your existing loan.

Should You Refinance Your  ARM?

In deciding whether to refinance an ARM you should consider these questions:

  • Is the next interest rate adjustment on your existing loan likely to increase your monthly payments substantially? Will the new interest rate be two or three percentage points higher than the prevailing rates being offered for either fixed-rate loans or other ARMs?
  • If the current mortgage sets a cap on your monthly payments, are those payments large enough to pay off your loan by the end of the original term? Will refinancing a new ARM or a fixed-rate enable you to pay your loan in full by the end of the term?

What Are The Costs of Refinancing?

The fees described below are the charges that you’ll most likely encounter in refinancing.

  • Title Search and Title Insurance
    This charge will cover the cost of examining the public record to confirm ownership of the property. It also covers the cost of a policy, usually issued by a title insurance company, that insures the policy holder in a specific amount for any loss caused by discrepancies in the title to the property. Be sure to ask the company carrying the present policy if it can re-issue your policy at a re-issue rate. You could save up to 70 percent of what it would cost you for a new policy.
  • Lender’s Attorney’s Review Fees
    The lender will usually charge you for fees paid to the lawyer or company that conducts the closing for the lender. Settlements are conducted by lending institutions, title insurance companies, escrow companies, real estate brokers, and attorneys for the buyer and seller. In most situations, the person conducting the settlement is providing a service to the lender. You may want to retain your own attorney to represent you at all stages of the transaction, including settlement.
  • Loan Origination Fees and Discount Points
    The origination fee is charged for the lender’s work in evaluating and preparing your mortgage loan. Discount points are prepaid finance charges imposed by the lender at closing to increase the lender’s yield beyond the stated interest rate on the mortgage note. One point equals one percent of the loan amount. For example, one point on a $100,000 loan would be $1,000. In some cases, the points you pay can be financed by adding them to the loan amount. The total number of points a lender charges will depend on market conditions and the interest rate to be charged.
  • Appraisal Fee
    This fee pays for an appraisal which is a supportable and defensible estimate or opinion of the value of the property.
  • Prepayment Penalty
    A prepayment penalty on your present mortgage could be the greatest determent to refinancing. The practice of charging money for an early pay-off of the existing mortgage loan varies be state, type of lender, and type of loan. Prepayment penalties are forbidden on various loans including loans from federally chartered credit unions, FHA and VA loans, and some other home-purchase loans. The mortgage documents for your existing loan will state if there is a penalty for prepayment. In some loans, you may be charged interest for the full month in which your prepay your loan.
  • Miscellaneous
    Depending on the type of loan you have and other factors, another major expense you might face is the fee for a VA loan guarantee, FHA mortgage insurance, or private mortgage insurance. There are a few other closing costs in addition to these.

In conclusion, a homeowner should plan on paying an average of 3 to 6 percent of the outstanding principal in refinancing costs, plus any prepayment penalties and costs of paying off any second mortgage that may exist. One way of saving on some of these costs is to check first with the lender who holds your current mortgage. The lender may be willing to waive some of them, especially if the work relating to the mortgage closing is still current. This could include the fees for the title search, surveys, inspections, and so on.

The information contained in this page is intended to help you ask the right questions when considering refinancing your loan. It is not a replacement for professional advice. Talk with mortgage lenders, real estate agents, attorneys, and other advisors about lending practices, mortgage instruments, and your own interests before you commit to any specific loan.

Refinancing Savings On A $100,000 Loan
Your Present Mortgage Rate Current Monthly Payment Monthly Payment Monthly Savings Annual Savings
@ 6.0%
@ 6.0%
@ 6.0%
10 $878 $600 $144 $1,728
9.5 $841 $600 $107 $1,284
9 $805 $600 $71 $852
8.5 $769 $600
8 $734 $600
7.5 $700 $600
7 $665 $600
6.5 $632 $600
6 $600 $600

NMLS# 57916

Call today for your Kentucky Mortgage Refinance Mortgage -502-905-3708