Can You Afford to Buy a House?


Can You Afford to Buy a House?.

Be sure to factor in all the costs

By Michelle Dawson | Realtor.com

Although the thought of paying a mortgage is more enticing than paying rent, it’s important to understand all the costs involved in buying and owning a home as you determine whether you can afford to join the ranks of homeowners.

Potential buyers sometimes forget to factor in the down payment, homeowners insurance and the possibility of depreciation, as well as the costs associated with closing the transaction, moving, purchasing major appliances, and home, landscape and pool maintenance, not to mention furnishings and design accessories once you move in.
The days of calling up the landlord to fix your problems come to an abrupt halt when you’re a homeowner. You’ll be responsible for everything from malfunctioning appliances to leaky faucets to broken heating and air conditioning units and everything in between. And if you buy an older home, you’ll probably eventually encounter costly repairs, such as replacing the roof or windows.
To determine whether you can afford to buy a home, you should do the following:
1. Determine the property value of homes that interest you. The property value (what the home is worth) is determined by comparing the prices of homes recently sold of similar size in the same neighborhood. Your real estate agent will be able to provide this information to you.
2. Review different mortgage loan types and compare their required down payment amounts to the money you have available. Down payments, based on a percentage of the value of the property and determined by the type of mortgage you select, typically range from three to 20 percent of the property value. Don’t forget to factor in private mortgage insurance, a policy that allows mortgage lenders to recover part of their financial losses if a borrower fails to full re-pay a loan. Mortgage insurance makes it possible to buy a home with as little as 3 percent down. Usually, the lower the down payment, the higher the PMI, which typically will cost somewhere between $40 and $125 a month.
3. Get an estimate of your closing costs, including points (the dollar amount paid to a lender for obtaining a lower interest rate on a loan—one point is one percent of the loan amount), taxes, recording, inspections, prepaid loan interest, title insurance (a policy that insures a home buyer against errors in the title search; cost of the policy is usually a function of the value of the property, and is often borne by the purchaser and/or seller) and financing costs from your mortgage lender or a real estate professional. These will generally add up to between 2 and 7 percent of the property value. You’ll receive an estimate of these costs from your lender after you apply for a mortgage.
4. Add the down payment requirements and the closing costs together to determine the amount of money you’ll need right off the bat. But you’re not done yet.
5. Think about the actual move. Will you hire a moving company or rent a truck? Either way will cost you. The more stuff you have, the more it will cost.
6. Property taxes. Many lenders will require an impound account in which monthly payments for property tax (and often insurance) are paid together with the monthly mortgage payment. You can figure your average annual tax rate will be about 1.5 percent of the purchase price of your home.
7. Next, budget for maintenance and repairs. HouseMaster, a home inspection company with 300 franchises nationwide, said that based on a study that evaluated 2,000 inspection reports, the typical costs of major repairs are:
  • Roofing: $1,500 to $5,000
  • Electrical systems: $20 to $1,500
  • Plumbing systems: $300 to $5,000
  • Central cooling: $800 to $2,500
  • Central heating: $1,500 to $3,000
  • Insulation: $800 to $1,500
  • Structural systems: $3,000 to $1,500
  • Water seepage: $600 to $5,000
Once you crunch the numbers and find you come up a bit short, investigate ways to reduce or creatively fund your down payment—it can come from a variety of sources. Check with your realtor or lender to find out what’s available.
You’ll also need to factor in the cost of homeowners insurance. In addition to the type of construction, age of the home, your credit history and past insurance history, new issues like litigating costly toxic mold cases are raising homeowners insurance rates.
In fact, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners reports that homeowners will spent an average of $822 on homeowners insurance in 2007, the last year data was available.
In your final analysis of whether you can afford to buy a home, you’ll want to weigh the costs with the financial benefits—a consistent mortgage payment (unlike rent, which can increase), the tax benefits (you can deduct, in most cases, mortgage interest, closing costs, and property taxes), and the all-important appreciation factor—the rate of increase in a home’s value.
And of course, you’ll want to weigh perhaps the biggest benefit of all—having a place to call your own.

What is P.I.T.I


What is P.I.T.I?.

 

What is P.I.T.I?

September 17, 2012

When you’re buying or selling a house, there are many terms that come up. Though your local REALTOR can guide you through much of the terminology, there are some terms that you should be familiar with, and PITI is one of them. You will see PITI associated with your loan documents and mortgage paperwork. The following is an explanation of the term and the meaning of each of its letters.

P is for Principal
The principal is the total base amount of money that you are borrowing to buy your home. The principal is generally the biggest portion of the PITI figure.

I is for Interest
Whenever you borrow money or pay on credit, you have to pay an interest charge. The interest is usually calculated as a percentage and appears as an amount on the PITI breakdown. Depending on the deal you have, the interest rate can stay fixed for the term of the loan or it can be variable.

 T is for Taxes
Taxation is one of the eternal certainties of life! Taxes involved with home ownership typically go to governments at the local level to pay for public services. The tax amounts are typically included with the monthly mortgage prorated. The lender pays the tax on your behalf to the local government.

The other I is for Insurance
Your home is one of the biggest investments you will make, and a homeowner’s insurance policy is vital for your financial well-being. There are various policies from which you can select, but the choices available to you depend on how much money you put down on your property. If you make a down payment of less than 20%, lenders require that you purchase private mortgage insurance (PMI).  This protects the lender in the event of loan default or foreclosure. Similar to the way it is with taxes, these payments are generally added into your total mortgage payment.

How do you calculate income for self-employed borrowers Kentucky Mortgage?


How do you calculate income for self-employed borrowers?.

 

Under normal Fannie Mae underwriting standards, a borrower is considered self-employed if he or she owns more than 25% of a business from which income is derived. Any lower percentage ownership and a borrower can simply be considered employed by the firm (Yes, this is a help for co-owners of a small business – if you own less than 25% you don’t even have to read this article).

How do you calculate income for self-employed borrowers Kentucky Mortgage?
Self-employed borrowers who want to go the full documentation route must be able to provide the following:

1) two years of business tax returns; 2) two years of personal tax returns; 3) a letter from a CPA confirming two years of self-employment; and 4) a year to date profit and loss statement. If there are any problems with this information, then additional documentation will be required, such as letters from accountants, business bank statements or other financial records.

Underwriters average the net income to the business owner over the past two years to obtain an estimate of total income.If a business owner suffered a difficult year in 2011, but in all years before and after income was significantly higher, then the averaging method of analyzing income would unfairly deny the borrower a standard loan.

First Time Home Buyer Louisville Kentucky Mortgage Programs

Home Buyer Louisville Kentucky Mortgage Programs


 

KHC Loan Programs

Call us today for your next home purchase 502-905-3708

 

All Kentucky Housing first mortgage loans are for a 30-year term at a fixed rate of interest. The home you purchase through Kentucky Housing must be the only residential property you own and you must occupy the home as your principal residence while the loan debt is still outstanding. To qualify, you must meet KHC’s regular income guidelines, make a down payment or qualify for down payment assistance, be a US citizen or legal alien and have an acceptable credit history. Some Kentucky Housing loans are subject to a federal recapture tax. Recapture is a federal income tax that the borrowers may have to pay if they have considerable growth in their income and they sell or transfer their KHC-financed home within 9 years. However, KHC has implemented a Recapture Tax Guarantee Program for all loans that close after October 1, 2006. The Recapture Tax Guarantee Program will reimburse homeowners if they are subject to pay the Federal Recapture Tax on their KHC mortgage loan upon the sale of their home.

Conventional Insured by approved mortgage insurance company. Minimum credit score of 660 or better. Quick turnaround time, 20 percent down payment and no up-front or monthly mortgage insurance.

FHA Insured by the Federal Housing Administration. Down payments as little as 3.5 percent. Can use DAP for 3.5 percent down payment requirement. Upfront and monthly mortgage insurance. Minimum credit score of 620.

VA Guaranteed by the Veterans Administration for qualified military veterans. No down payment if the property appraises for the sale price or greater. Credit underwriting is flexible. Minimum credit score of 620. No monthly mortgage insurance payments.

RHS Guaranteed by Rural Housing Services (RHS). Home must be located in a rural area as defined by RHS. No down payment if the property appraises for the sale price or greater. Minimum credit score of 620. No monthly mortgage insurance payments.

Mortgage Credit Certificates (MCC) A Mortgage Credit Certificates (MCC) reduces the amount of federal income tax you pay, giving you more available income to qualify for a mortgage loan. MCCs are NOT mortgages. They are tax credits that put extra cash in your pocket each month, so you can more easily afford a house payment. That means fewer tax dollars will be withheld from your regular paycheck, increasing your take-home pay. The federal government allows every homeowner an income tax deduction for all the interest paid each year on a mortgage loan. But an MCC gives you a tax credit of 25 percent (not to exceed $2,000). You can still deduct the remaining 75 percent interest on your income taxes. A tax credit is not the same as a tax deduction. A tax deduction reduces the portion of your income that is taxed, so you pay less. A tax credit is a direct, dollar for dollar reduction in the total tax you owe. The MCC is effective for the life of the loan as long as you live in the home. If you sell your home in the first nine years of ownership, you may be subject to Federal Recapture Tax.

Special First Mortgage Loan Programs New Construction Program for Single-Parent, Disabled and Elderly Households offers loans for newly constructed houses at interest rates from 1 to 6 percent. These limited funds are available, usually in July, on a first-come, first-served basis. Guidelines Interest rate determined by the families’ ability to repay the loan. For new homes with a purchase price of $115,000 or less. Eligible borrowers: Single parents (at least one dependent under the age of 18 must live in the home.) Households with a person who has a permanent disability and who receives some form of disability income (SSI, SSDI, Veterans Disability etc.). Households where at least one of the home buyers is age 62 or older. Income guidelines: $28,000 for a household of 1 or 2 people; or $33,000 for a household of 3 or more people. Kentucky Housing’s DAP loan program may be used for down payment and closing cost assistance. Applying for a Kentucky Housing loan is easy. Just contact one of our approved lenders near you and ask for a Kentucky Housing loan.

First Time Home Buyer

 Programs in Kentucky

Complete First Time Home Buyer Programs Available in Kentucky.

 

The state agency created by the legislature in Kentucky to offer first time home buyer programs is the Kentucky Housing Corporation. Here is a summary of the current first time home buyer programs that are offered:

Regular Down payment Assistance Program (DAP)

Assistance up to $5,000.
Available to all KHC first mortgage loan recipients.
Repaid over 7 or 10 years at a low fixed interest rate (6.0%)

HOME-DAP

Assistance up to $4,500
No monthly repayment; forgiven over five years.
Existing homes only.
Borrowers must meet HOME-income guidelines.

HOME Special Program

Assistance up to $10,000
No monthly repayment; forgiven over five years.
Existing homes only.
Borrowers must meet HOME-income guidelines.
Purchase price may not exceed $200,000.
Eligible borrowers include:
Households that include a person with a permanent disability and who receives disability income (SSI, SSDI, Veterans Disability etc.).
Households where at least one of the home buyers is age 62 or older.

HOME Family Program

Assistance up to $10,000
No monthly repayment; forgiven over five years.
Existing homes only.
Borrowers must meet HOME-income guidelines.
Purchase price may not exceed $200,000.
Eligible borrowers include:
Single- and two-parent households that have at least one dependent child under the age of 18 living in the household and that are first-time home buyers (have not owned a home or had an ownership interest in a home in the last 3 years).

 Down Payment Assistance.  Kentucky Housing Corporation.  City of Louisville Down Payment Assistance.  KHC Home Loans.  The Housing Partnership, Inc.  Low Down Payment Home Loans.  FHA Mortgage Loans.  Homebuyer Education.  Forgiveable Down Payment Assistance.  Kentucky First Time Homebuyer Grants.  Neighborworks American.  Pre-purchase Homebuyer Counseling.  First Time Home Buyer Counseling.  Louisville Urban League.  HUD homes.  Louisville Home Loans.  Kentucky Home Loans.  Lexington Home Loans.  Bowling Green Home Loans.  Frankfort Home Loans.  Paducah Home Loans.  Northern Kentucky Home Loans.  Bowling Green Home Loans.  Richmond Home Loans.  Owensboro Home Loans.  Louisville Refinance.  Kentucky Refinance.  Louisville KY refinance.  Lexington KY Refinance.  Bowling Green KY Refinance.  Frankfort KY refinance.  Louisville KY relocation.  Louisville KY relocation mortgage.  Relocation mortgage loans KY.  Lexington Ky relocation.  Lexington KY relocation mortgage.  New home purchase louisville ky.  New home purchase ky.  Kentucky FHA loans.  KY FHA loans.  Ky Fha approved lenders.  KHC approved Lenders.  Fannie Mae DU refinance ky lenders.  Experienced mortgage lenders KY.  Low Down payment home loans ky.  Low Down Payment home loans kentucky.  Low closing costs ky.  low closing costs mortgage ky.  low closing costs refinance ky.  Jumbo loans ky.  Jumbo loans Louisville ky.  Arm loans ky.  Arm loans louisville ky.  Local mortgage companies ky.  Local mortgage companies louisville ky.  Low rate mortgage ky.  Low rate mortgage louisville ky.  FHA Loans Louisville ky.  FHA Loans Kentucky.  FHA Purchase Ky.  FHA purchase Loan ky.  FHA refinance Louisville KY.  FHA refinance ky.  FHA interest rates ky.  FHA interest rates Louisville KY.

Louisville, Ky Mortgage Lenders: For a Quick Easy Loan Approval:Have These Items Re…


Louisville, Ky Mortgage Lenders: For a Quick Easy Loan Approval:Have These Items Ready

Employment

____ Name and address of employers for the past two years
____ Copy of pay stubs for the previous 30 days
____ Copy of last two years w-2 forms
        (if commissioned or paid by 1099, copy of last two years complete tax returns)
 

Self-employed

____ Copy of last two years tax returns (personal and corporate);
        year to date P&L and Balance Sheet through the most recent quarter
 

Liabilities

____ Name and account numbers for all revolving and installment accounts
____ Name and account number for all mortgage loans for the previous two years
____ Name and address for landlords for the previous two years
 

Assets

____ Name, address, and account number for all bank accounts
____ Name, address, and account numbers for all brokerage accounts
____ Copies of statements covering last 3 months on asset accounts
____ Copy of most recent statement for 401K, Savings Plan, etc.
 
 

Miscellaneous

____ Copy of driver’s license and social security card
____ Copy of fully executed divorce decree if applicable
____ Copy of signed earnest money contract
____ Copy of lease agreements on rental properties
____ Veterans! Copy of DD 214 and Eligibility Cert. if you have it
____ Check for the cost of your credit report and appraisal

FHA Mortgage Requirements Louisville Kentucky Mortgage First Time Home Buyer


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Why Are More Kentucky Mortgage Loans Not Being Refinanced?


 

Kentucky Mortgage Rates at all time low..Call now for a free-analysis 502-905-3708

 

Why Are More Kentucky Mortgage Loans Not Being Refinanced?

Why Are More Kentucky Mortgage Loans Not Being Refinanced?October 25, 2010

While mortgage interest rates are at their lowest levels since 1945, millions of mortgages that carry interest rates of 6% to 9% or even higher, are not being refinanced. The reasons for this involve Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two secondary market giants now in Government conservatorships, in a central role.
The problem is perhaps best seen through the eyes of borrowers who are unable to refinance. Each unsuccessful borrower cited below is representative of a sizeable group of unsuccessful borrowers.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac Have Become Excessively Restrictive

 

 

Adam was turned down for a refinance because he did not meet the new stiffer underwriting and pricing requirements set by the agencies in their standard programs. His credit score, which was acceptable when he got his loan before the crisis, is not high enough to meet the new requirements.
It clearly was appropriate for the agencies to correct the excessively liberal rules that had prevailed during the go-go years, which contributed to the financial crisis. However, they have reacted to their excessive liberality before the crisis by becoming excessively restrictive in the aftermath. Their underwriting and pricing structures are designed to maximize their net earnings, as if they were still private firms.

Fannie and Freddie are now part of the Government, and should set their underwriting rules and pricing adjustments not to maximize net revenue but to break-even over a long time horizon.

Kentucky Mortgage Loans

 

There Should Be No Maximum LTV on the HARP Program
Barbara is one of many homeowners who bought during the go-go years and who now owe more than their houses are worth – she is “underwater”. She applied for a loan under the Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP), which was designed to make refinance possible for underwater borrowers who are current on their payments and whose loans are owned by Fannie or Freddie. Barbara is ineligible, however, because she is too far underwater. Her loan-to-value ratio (LTV)  is 130% and the agencies have set a 125% maximum.
A maximum LTV in the HARP programs cuts out a sizeable segment of the potential market, for no good reason. The agencies are already on the hook for any losses on high LTV loans, and a rate reduction can only reduce the probability that a default will occur that would trigger the loss. Indeed, the reduction in expected loss from a rate-reducing refinance is larger on a 150% LTV than on a 125% LTV. The default rate has to fall only half as much on a 150% loan as on a 125% loan to generate the same reduction in expected loss.

Fannie and Freddie should scrap the LTV maximum in the HARP program, for which there is no rational reason, thereby also eliminating the need for appraisals on HARP loans.

Kentucky Mortgage Loans

Too Few Lenders Make 125% HARP Loans

Charley was turned down for a refinance under the HARP program, although his LTV was only 120%, which made him eligible under agency rules. Nonetheless, the lenders Charley approached would not make the loan. They told him that their maximum LTV was 105%, and some said that it was 95%. Charley could have refinanced if he knew where to go, but he didn’t and gave up the search.
I did a quick and dirty survey and found that HARP loans above 105% are not available from brokers or from smaller lenders who sell to wholesalers who in turn sell to the agencies. HARP loans exceeding 105% are only available from some of the lenders who sell directly to the agencies.
Freddie Mac has a list of HARP lenders at http://www.freddiemac.com/cgi-bin/homeowners/relief_refi.cgi, but it is extremely difficult to find. If Fannie has one, I could not find it. The Freddie list has 27 lenders, 14 of which do 125% loans, of which only 4 have wide multi-state presence:

Fannie and Freddie ought to do a better job of informing potential borrowers how to find a lender who will make 125% HARP loans, and they should review their policies that have discouraged broader lender participation.

 

Borrowers With LTVs Above 105% Who Have PMI Can Refinance Only With Their Current Servicer
Doris’s situation was the same as Charley’s, including an LTV of 120%,  with one difference. Doris’s existing loan carries privarw mortgage insurance (PMI). The lenders who turned her down told her that the mortgage insurer had to agree to shift the MI policy to the new loan, but would not do so in her case.
Under HARP rules, if there is no MI on the existing loan, none is required on the new loan. If there was MI on the old loan, as in Doris’s case, it will be carried forward on the new loan, provided the PMI firm agrees. But if the current LTV exceeds 105%, they won’t agree unless the new loan is being made by the existing servicer.
Doris was not aware that only the lender servicing her loan can shift the mortgage insurance policy from the existing loan to a new one. PMIs will not shift the mortgage insurance to a new loan with a different lender when the LTV exceeds 105%.

Fannie and Freddie ought to inform potential HARP borrowers who have mortgage insurance and LTVs greater than 105% that they can only refinance with their current lender, and they should examine whether there is anything they can do to remove the PMI roadblock.

 

Kentucky Mortgage Loans

HARP Should Be Expanded to Cover Mortgages Not Owned by Fannie or Freddie
Ethan is an underwater borrower in good standing whose loan is not owned by Fannie or Freddie. His only possibility of a refinance is the new FHA program I wrote about a few weeks ago, but that program requires the existing lender to write-down the balance to 97.75% of house value. Since Ethan is making timely payments, the lender has very little incentive to do that.
Ethan had no say in who ended up owning his loan, from his perspective it was a coin toss that came up tails and made him ineligible for HARP. The out-of-luck group to which Ethan belongs includes a large number of sub-prime borrowers who meet their obligations faithfully while paying rates up to 9% and even higher.
There is no good reason why such borrowers have to be left entirely out in the cold. While including these borrowers in HARP would expose Fannie and Freddie to risks they did not have before, the agencies could set payment performance requirements and charge risk premiums large enough to protect taxpayers while still offering many of these borrowers substantial relief..

 

Treasury should have the agencies develop a HARP1 program covering loans they do not now own that would be subject to underwriting rules and price adjustments consistent with the Government breaking even.

 


Kentucky Mortgage Loans

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