Tag: Mortgage insurance

Different Mortgage Insurance Types  for Conventional Loans

Different Mortgage Insurance Types for Conventional Loans


Mortgage Insurance for Conventional Loans in Kentucky.

Four different types of private mortgage insurance

1. Borrower-Paid Monthly (BPMI)
BPMI permits the borrower to pay the MI premium monthly, or as a single upfront premium.
BPMI helps lenders offset the risk of a low down-payment mortgage.
Borrowers can qualify for a loan with a smaller down payment, enabling them to purchase a home sooner.

2. Lender-Paid (LPMI)
Benefits the borrower and lender
With LPMI, the lender pays the MI premium on behalf of the borrower, thus allowing the lender to charge a slightly higher interest rate on the loan.
In addition to increasing loan volume, LPMI lets you realize additional servicing profits through secondary marketing execution. Benefits include:
Potential to originate larger first mortgages, resulting in higher servicing values
Increase retention rates and repeat loan transactions through higher customer satisfaction
Risk based pricing options can offer even better rates for credit worthy borrowers
Benefits to the borrower:
Lower down payment needed
Possibility of qualifying for a larger loan without increasing monthly payments

3. Borrower-Paid Single Premium
A single premium is a MI product that can be financed, paid using seller concessions, other contributions, or paid out of the borrowers own funds.
Saves the borrower significant money on the long term cost of MI. If it is financed it is also tax deductible because it is financed into the loan.
The cost of MI overall usually equates to four-five years of premium. In some cases, with credit score buckets, it can be much less.

4. Split-Monthly
By splitting the MI cost into an upfront premium and a smaller monthly renewal, split MI dramatically reduces a borrower’s monthly MI payment.
Split monthly can help the borrower qualify for a larger loan while generating higher profits for the lender.
Split MI can give you a competitive advantage over the competition by lowering the monthly MI. The monthly MI may be reduced by paying an “upfront premium” to buy down the monthly MI. The upfront premium may be financed: paid using seller concessions, lender credits, or paid in cash at closing. You can use a combination of these options to cover the upfront premium.
The upfront split premium counts in points and fees just like single premium MI.
May be used as a strategy to help reduce a DTI over 45 to avoid a price adjustment.

Questions on what the best mortgage insurance option is for your mortgage loan.

Contact me below:

 

Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer
 
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 | MB73346
 


Text/call 502-905-3708
kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant’s eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant  Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916 http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
 
— Some products and services may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. The content in this marketing advertisement has not been approved, reviewed, sponsored or endorsed by any department or government agency. Rates are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification.

 

Kentucky USDA Mortgage Upfront Guarantee Fee and the monthly mortgage insurance Annual fee

Kentucky USDA Mortgage Upfront Guarantee Fee and the monthly mortgage insurance Annual fee


via Kentucky USDA Mortgage Upfront Guarantee Fee and the monthly mortgage insurance Annual fee

 

Kentucky Rural Housing Loans for 2018

USDA home loans in Kentucky are also known as the Rural Development Loan or RHS Loans. It is one of the best options for homebuyers that are currently looking for a home outside the urban areas of Lexington, Louisville, Bowling Green and Northern Kentucky that requires No Money Down.
Another major advantage of this home loan is it’s fixed interest rate.  The fixed interest rate insulate buyers from interest rate fluctuations. You’ll have the same monthly loan repayment throughout the life of your loan.
100 percent Financing Kentucky USDA Rural Development Loans will allow you to roll up some of your closing cost into your monthly mortgage. While it is impossible to avoid closing costs of the home purchase, it is possible to have the seller pay for some of these cost and or arranged for them to be added to your total loan with minimal impact on your monthly payments.

Eligibility for Kentucky USDA Loans

When applying for eligibility for 100% USDA loans, There are six factors taken into account:
  • Loan income restrictions Most household income limits are set between $78k for a family of four, and up to $103k for a family of five or more see map >>>>>http://www.rd.usda.gov/files/RD-GRHLimitMap.pdf
  • Credit score  You have three credit scores, they throw and the high and low score and take the middle score of each of the three main credit bureaus, experian, equifax, and transunion.Most lenders will want a 640 middle credit score due to the fact that GUS(Guaranteed Underwriting System) will not give you an automated approval upfront if the middle score is below the 640 threshold. You may get a refer eligible on the initial pre-approval but a lot of lenders will not honor a refer eligible USDA file.
  • Property Ownership (Do you own other Property) In most cases, USDA will not allow you to use their program to purchase another home if you already have a home in your name. In some extreme cases, they will waive this if certain exceptions are met. You can call or email me for more details on this matter. The USDA loans are only available for single family primary residences. No rental homes or working farms are allowed on the USDA Home Loan Program
  • Residential Location (USDA Eligibility:  to checkk click here ) Is the property located in a Eligible area. See link above for eligibility boundaries for counties in Kentucky
  • Debt to Income Ratios: If your credit score is above 640, GUS will typically limit your backend ratio to 45% of your total gross income. The front end ratio, or the housing ratio, usually is centered around 30% to 35% range, with compensating factors such as assets or money in bank to cover your new house payment, disposable income, high credit scores, and no rent payment shock. Rent payment shock is where your new house payment is much larger than your current rent payment. This only comes into play on lower credit scores.
  • Assets  I have noticed that with 3 or 4 months reserves you can typically get a loan approved with lower credit scores with payment shock on the new loan. Additionally, if you have access to 20% down payment in your checking or savings account, they will make you use your own money. If the money is in a 401k or other tax deferred savings accounts this will not factor in and you can use the USDA loan program.
  • I can explain this more in detail if you want to call or email me.

 

 

Joel Lobb Senior  Loan Officer

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.

10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
 Fax:     (502) 327-9119
Company ID #1364 | MB73346E
http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant’s eligibility and market conditions.  NMLS#57916 http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
. The content in this marketing advertisement has not been approved, reviewed, sponsored or endorsed by any department or government agency. Rates are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification.

 

 

 

 

2018 Kentucky First Time Home Buyer Loan Programs


via 2018 Kentucky First Time Home Buyer Loan Programs

 

Getting a mortgage for a home can seem like a complicated and mysterious process. Just like any good investment, you should never buy anything that you don’t understand.  Knowing how the mortgage lending system works will relieve much of the stress and anxiety associated with making what is most likely the largest purchase of your entire life. This article will help you understand…

What You Need To Know About A Mortgage… BEFORE You Get One!!!

Qualifying for a Mortgage

Home LoansMortgage companies are in business to make money by lending money that is secured by an asset large enough to sell and recover their capital if the borrower is no longer able or willing to pay the payments. They are not in the business of owning property and would rather not have to foreclose on a loan, repossess the property and sell it to recapture their capital. This does happen but it is not their primary business. They would rather have their borrowers make their payments so that they could collect the interest and move on down the road. To increase their odds of that happening, mortgage companies look at several areas of your financial history to determine if you will meet their standards. This is called Qualifying for a Mortgage.

What the mortgage company finds when they look at these areas will help determine the type of mortgage that is available to you and the interest rate you will pay on the money that you borrow.

The areas that they are interested in looking at are:

Job History

Lenders want to know if you have been in your current job and/or profession for at least two years. They also want to know if you are retired or self-employed.

Income

TaxesMortgage lenders want to know how much your monthly income is before taxes are taken out (Gross Monthly Income). Typically you will be asked to provide check stubs for the last 30 days and Federal Tax Returns or W-2’s for the last two years to prove your income.

If you are self-employed and it is difficult for you to prove your gross income to the lender you may be able to get a “stated income” loan. If that is the route that you take, your income must be “reasonable” for your profession. Since stated income loans are riskier for the lender you will generally have a higher interest rate.

Credit History

Mortgage lenders really like it if you have a history of paying your bills on time. This is reflected in your credit report and FICO score. If you have “bad credit”, you are NOT automatically disqualified from getting a mortgage. Lower credit scores will increase the interest rate that you will be required to pay and sometimes that increase will be quite significant.

Debt Load

You can have an awesome job with an income to make Bill Gates jealous and a great credit score but if you have already acquired too much long term debt you may not qualify for the loan you want.

assetsAssets

Mortgage lenders will want to check your bank accounts to make sure that you have the cash necessary to pay the down payment and closing costs and that you have “reserves” available to make the loan payment. Often, the lender will require 3-6 months reserves. (Reserves can be in a 401K or other retirement account that you can pull the money out of)

Requested Loan Amount

The loan you are requesting will need to be proportional to your ability to make the payments. Be reasonable with your house buying expectations – don’t expect to buy a lot more house than you can afford. The recent housing bust defined the term “house poor” and got a lot of people into financial trouble. Again, mortgage lenders would much rather you make your monthly house payments because everyone loses if they have to foreclose.

Determining YOUR Mortgage Interest Rate

The market place determines the range of interest rates available for any mortgage and the lending rates change daily. The specific interest rate you will pay is based on how well qualified you are and the type of loan you want.

Interest rates are typically based on the answers to these questions:

How Good Is Your Credit Score? 

FICO ScoreThe most widely used score is the FICO score, the credit score created by Fair Isaac Corporation. Lenders use the FICO Score to help them make billions of credit decisions every day. Fair Isaac calculates the FICO Score based solely on information in consumer credit reports maintained by the credit reporting agencies.

FICO credit scores range from 300 to 850. That FICO Score is calculated by a mathematical equation that evaluates many types of information from your credit report, at that agency. By comparing this information to the patterns in hundreds of thousands of past credit reports, the FICO Score estimates your level of future credit risk.

With the top end of the credit score being 850, anything above about 720 is considered excellent. Some local lenders set 740 as the benchmark for their preferred interest rates. Having a lower credit score DOES NOT mean you will not get a loan. You may qualify BUT your interest rate will be higher than someone with better credit.

How Big Is Your Down-Payment?

down-paymentThe Down-Payment is the amount of your own money you are going to put into buying the property. The more money you put into the property on the front end, the lower the risk of you not paying the payments. The amount of your down payment also directly affects the amount of your loan (purchase price – down payment = loan amount). This is called the Loan to Value Ratio (LTV).

The LTV is the percentage of the value of the house that the mortgage will cover (loan amount / purchase price x 100). For example, the property you are interested in buying is selling for $100,000. You have $20,000 for the down-payment and want a mortgage for the other $80,000. The LTV for this mortgage is 80%.

Similar to the LTV is the Combined Loan to Value Ratio (CLTV). The CLTV is used when 2 loans are used to finance the home purchase. You may see or hear terms like “80-20” or “80-15-5”. This refers to the 1st lien percentage (80), the 2nd lien percentage (20 or 15) and the down payment percentage (5).

How Much Debt Do You Currently Have?

It only makes sense that the more debt you have the riskier the loan is for the lender. There is a finite amount of income in all of our households and it all gets allocated every month. Lenders use a “debt-to-income” ratio to determine how qualified you are for the loan based on how much debt you already have.

debt_to_income_ratioYour Debt to Income Ratio (DTI) is the percentage of your income that you owe in debt on a monthly basis. For example, if you make $5,000 per month, and have debt payments (car loans, credit cards, student loans, etc.) of $2,000, your DTI ratio is 40%. The higher this ratio is, the less likely you will be to qualify for a low interest rate.

Conventional loans typically have a qualifying ratio of 28/36. FHA loans will sometimes allow for a higher debt load of 29/41 qualifying ratio.

The first number in a qualifying ratio is the maximum percentage of your gross monthly income that can be applied to your mortgage. That includes the loan principal and interestprivate mortgage insuranceproperty taxeshomeowners insurance, and homeowner’s association dues.

The second number is the maximum percentage of your gross monthly income that can be applied to housing expenses and recurring debt. Recurring debt includes monthly payments for carsboatsmotorcycleschild support payments and monthly credit card payments.

 Example:  of a 28/36 qualifying ratio:

Gross monthly income of $5,000 x .28 = $1400 can be applied to housing.

Gross monthly income of $5,000 x .36 = $1,800 can be applied to recurring debt plus housing expenses

Example: of a 29/41 qualifying ratio:

Gross monthly income of $5,000 x .29 = $1,450 can be applied to housing.

Gross monthly income of $5,000 x .41 = $2,050 can be applied to recurring debt plus housing expenses

These are just general guidelines and everyone’s personal finances are unique. To get the real answer about how well you qualify and to determine how large a mortgage a local lender will offer contact one of our preferred lenders and visit with a loan officer.

Here is a KEY point to remember…

FICO KEYYour credit score is THE most vital piece of information

when qualifying for a loan.

I am a Dave Ramsey fan and I believe in paying cash but even Dave concedes when it comes to buying a house. In Financial Peace Dave calls the FICO score an “I love debt score” and brags about not having one. He even tells a story about trying to rent an apartment and he couldn’t because he doesn’t have a FICO score. He then says, “I can’t rent an apartment because I don’t have a FICO score… I could write a check and buy the whole complex but I can’t rent an apartment because I don’t have a credit score!” Which is a great story for someone that CAN write a check and buy the whole complex… The rest of us need to maintain a really good credit score.

If you’re ready to buy a new home

and want to shop around for the best deal on a mortgage…

Looking for a mortgage, auto or student loan may cause multiple lenders to request your credit report, even though you are only looking for one loan. To compensate for this, the score ignores mortgage, auto, and student loan inquiries made in the 30 days prior to scoring. So, if you find a loan within 30 days, the inquiries won’t affect your score while you’re rate shopping. In addition, the score looks on your credit report for mortgage, auto, and student loan inquiries older than 30 days. If it finds some, it counts those inquiries that fall in a typical shopping period as just one inquiry when determining your score. For FICO scores calculated from older versions of the scoring formula, this shopping period is any 14 day span. For FICO scores calculated from the newest versions of the scoring formula, this shopping period is any 45 day span. Each lender chooses which version of the FICO scoring formula it wants the credit reporting agency to use to calculate your FICO score.

What Type of Loan Are You Looking For?

40 year fixed, 30 year fixed, 20 year fixed, 15 year fixed, 10 Year Fixed, Adjustable Rate, etc. All of these loan types have different interest rate ranges.

Locking Your Interest Rate

Once you have completed a loan application, determined what type of loan you want and qualified for that loan you can “lock” the interest rate for that loan. Locking the Interest Rate means, for the period of the “lock” you are guaranteed that interest rate. Lock periods are typically 15, 30 or 60 days, although you may be able to get an extended lock period.

Rate LockOnce you lock your interest rate:

If you do not close on the loan before the lock period expires, you will NOT have a guaranteed interest rate anymore. And, the longer the lock period, the higher the rate will be. For example, a 15 day lock may be at 5.125%, a 30 day lock at 5.25%, and a 60 day lock at 5.375%. So, before locking your loan, be sure you are not locking for too long a time or for too short a time.

Interest rates fluctuate daily and may go up or down. By locking your rate, you are betting that rates will go up in the future.

 What does “Buying Down” the Interest Rate Mean?

You can reduce the interest rate on your mortgage by paying “points” at closing. A point is 1% of the value of the loan, so a point on a $200,000 loan is $2,000. If you “buy down” you loan to a lower interest rate you will have lower monthly payments and pay less interest over the life of the loan. However, “buying down” you loan to a lower interest rate means more money out of your pocket on the front end when you close the loan. You should do the math and weigh each side of the equation before making a decision about buying down the interest rate or not.

What Are The Closing Costs and Fees?

Closing CostsThere are four types of closing costs and fees…

Those charged by the mortgage company and/or mortgage broker, those charged by 3rd party vendors, those charged by the Title Company, Escrow Company or Escrow Attorney and Pre-Paid Charges.

Lender Fees

These can include loan origination fees and Broker fees which are usually a percentage of the loan amount; administrative fees and application fees, processing fees and underwriting fees. These last fees usually run from $100 to $500, and ALL of them are negotiable.

3rd Party Vendor charges

These are charges collected by the lender and paid to outside companies that provide a service. These are not usually negotiable and can include appraisal charges, flood certification fees, courier charges, document prep fees, mortgage lender attorney fees, etc.

Title Company charges

These are the fees charged by the Title Company, Escrow Company or Escrow Attorney. They are usually set by the state and are not negotiable. These charges include title insurance, attorney fees, state/county/city registration fees, etc.

Pre-Paid Charges

If the lender will be establishing an escrow account to pay taxes and insurance, the buyer will pre-pay taxes and insurance to establish an escrow account and will pre-pay the interest on the loan until the end of the month in which the loan closes.

 Does The Closing Date Really Matter?

The day you choose to close determines the amount of pre-paid interest you will have to pay. Closing at the end of the month means that you will pay less pre-paid interest. For example, if you close on October 1st you will pay 31 days of pre-paid interest. If you close on October 31st you will pay 1 day of pre-paid interest.

When Is My First Payment Due?

It doesn’t matter what day of the month you close on, you will not have your first loan payment due until a month has passed. So, if you close in October, your first payment is due in December – you get November for free!

What Is PMI?

pmi-basics1Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) is required on all loans that have a LTV greater than 80%. PMI is an insurance premium that you pay every month as part of your monthly payment. However, PMI is not intended to protect you. PMI is insurance coverage that protects the mortgage lender against default on the loan. If you stop making your payments, the mortgage lender is paid a percentage of the loan amount (usually 25% to 35%) by the insurance company.

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Customer Testimonials

We just moved here the first of January in 2017 from Ohio to the Louisville, KY area and we found Joel’s website online. He was quick to respond to us and got back the same day on our loan approval. He was very knowledgeable about the local market and kept us up-to date throughout the loan process and was a pleasure to meet at closing. Would recommend his services.

Angela Forsythe

“We were searching online for mortgage companies in Louisville, Ky locally to deal with and found Joel’s website, and it was a godsend. He was great to work with, and delivered on everything he said he would do. I ended up referring my co-worker at UPS, and she was very pleased with his service and rates too. Would definitely vouch for him.” September 2016

Monica Leinhardt

“We contacted Joel back in July 2011 to refinance our Mortgage and he was great to work with. We contacted several lenders locally and online, and most where taking almost 60 days to close a refinance, Joel got it done in 23 days start to finish,I would definetly recommmend him. He got us 3.75% with just $900 in closing costs on our FHA Streamline loan.

Kayle Griffin

“Joel is one of the best Mortgage Brokers I have ever worked with in my sixteen years in the real estate and mortgage business.” May 25, 2010

Tim Beck

“Joel has always worked very hard to keep his word and to work out seasonable solutions to difficult problems. He is truly an expert in FHA and other type loans.”

September 1, 2010 Nancy Nalley
“I have worked with Joel since 1998. He is a great loan professional.” I refer most of my Louisville, Kentucky area home buyers to him and he always take special care of them.

August 23, 2012 Jon ClarK

“Joel Lobb is a real professional in the lending industry, with many years of experience, he is the one to go to for any mortgage lending needs.” August 22, 2011

RICHARD VOLZ , Residential Sales , Remax Foursquare Realty
“When looking to purchase our new home in 2006, I had the pleasure of meeting Joel Lobb. Not only was he personable and easy to reach, he was extremely knowledgeable in his field and made sure to find us the best rate and a top notch mortgage company. We were able to complete the process in less than 3 weeks with his expertise. I find Joel to have the utmost high integrity and I recommend him to anyone who say’s they are need of mortgage assistance. He is also fantastic and keeping everyone up to date on the latest in the housing industry through his twitter posts. He provided great results for our family and we still communicate to this day!”

August 21, 2010
Stacie Drake

 

“We first use Joel on our new home purchase in 2007 in St Matthews, Kentucky area and he was great to work with. We have since refinanced our home with him in 2010 when rates got really low and he has always delivered on what he says. I could not imagine using anyone else.”

Melody Glasscock March 2014

 
Absolutely Amazing!! I emailed Joel after I had just got a denial from a bank and just thought i would try to get some advice on what my next steps would be to get a house. I honestly didn’t expect to even get a reply because my credit is not great. That was about a week and a half ago. I just signed a contract on a house last night. ONLY because of Joel Lobb. He even worked with us throughout the weekend, which shocked me. Best decision I have ever made. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR WORKING WITH US THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE PROCESS.
Cee Bellisle August 2017

Contacted him about buying a home and he was great to work with. I was moving to Louisville Ky to take a new job and he walked me through the entire process. He explained to me all the different options for FHA, VA, USDA mortgage loans and credit score requirements versus Fannie Mae. Since I was a first time home buyer I needed alot of help and guidance. I would definitely recommend him. Fast to respond and available to answer questions that I or my realtor had after hours.

 

Anderson Johnson April 2018

 

 

We moved from Michigan to Northern Kentucky area and we were really impressed. We got a USDA loan no money down and closed in less than 3.5 weeks. We shopped around online with other lenders but Joel was always first to respond and his rates were just a little better than other lenders. He kept us informed through the process along with our realtor and there was absolutely no surprises like we heard from other co-workers and friends that they experienced in their loan process. We have already referred another co-worker to Joel . He’s AWESOME!

Patty Kingston June 2018

 

Locking In Rates


 

Locking In Rates

e

When is it appropriate to ‘lock in’ our interest rate?

 

May 17, 2004

Good question. And, as with the answer to so many things, it depends. Some say:

1. It is considered a fool’s game to try to time the bottom of the market.
2. If you can’t afford to lose, you can’t afford to gamble.
3. Interest rates can, and do, go up…as much as 3/4% or more in one week.

Although we certainly have not seen evidence of it lately, interest rates can rise and fall often and rapidly. The Wall Streetmoney market” is manipulated by so many factors, it is extremely difficult to predict. Everyone is guessing what might happen, but no one really knows. If you want to be safe, you lock in as soon as your lender will allow it.

Sometimes you need a tough hide to “float” and ride along with the market fluctuations. If you do this, you believe interest rates will fall during the period of your mortgage processing, and you must be prepared to take the consequences if they do not.

Before you decide which way to go, be sure you understand your lender’s rules. Some allow you to lock in at the time of application, generally without cost for 15 to 30 days; some only let you lock in after you are approved for the loan and, in a busy environment, this can take a few weeks. Some will let you lock in for extended periods of time for a fee, often payable upfront and nonrefundable. Some will allow you a “float down” option that provides you with a lower rate if rates go down, typically for a cost.

As you can tell by some of my comments, I would suggest you lock in your rate as soon as you can…then forget about it. You will sleep better. There are not many people who can stand the uncertainty of gambling with this big commitment.

Discuss the options with your loan officer, be sure you understand whether you are getting a “lock” with the lender making the loan and what period it covers. I have heard horror stories of “locks” made for short periods when everyone is so busy, and the timeline for closing is just about impossible. That’s a promise that is useless. Be sure you understand what kind of company you are dealing with, whether you have a true commitment on your rate and fee, one that really be trusted and accomplished.

Good luck.

Can You Afford to Buy a House?


Can You Afford to Buy a House?.

Be sure to factor in all the costs

By Michelle Dawson | Realtor.com

Although the thought of paying a mortgage is more enticing than paying rent, it’s important to understand all the costs involved in buying and owning a home as you determine whether you can afford to join the ranks of homeowners.

Potential buyers sometimes forget to factor in the down payment, homeowners insurance and the possibility of depreciation, as well as the costs associated with closing the transaction, moving, purchasing major appliances, and home, landscape and pool maintenance, not to mention furnishings and design accessories once you move in.
The days of calling up the landlord to fix your problems come to an abrupt halt when you’re a homeowner. You’ll be responsible for everything from malfunctioning appliances to leaky faucets to broken heating and air conditioning units and everything in between. And if you buy an older home, you’ll probably eventually encounter costly repairs, such as replacing the roof or windows.
To determine whether you can afford to buy a home, you should do the following:
1. Determine the property value of homes that interest you. The property value (what the home is worth) is determined by comparing the prices of homes recently sold of similar size in the same neighborhood. Your real estate agent will be able to provide this information to you.
2. Review different mortgage loan types and compare their required down payment amounts to the money you have available. Down payments, based on a percentage of the value of the property and determined by the type of mortgage you select, typically range from three to 20 percent of the property value. Don’t forget to factor in private mortgage insurance, a policy that allows mortgage lenders to recover part of their financial losses if a borrower fails to full re-pay a loan. Mortgage insurance makes it possible to buy a home with as little as 3 percent down. Usually, the lower the down payment, the higher the PMI, which typically will cost somewhere between $40 and $125 a month.
3. Get an estimate of your closing costs, including points (the dollar amount paid to a lender for obtaining a lower interest rate on a loan—one point is one percent of the loan amount), taxes, recording, inspections, prepaid loan interest, title insurance (a policy that insures a home buyer against errors in the title search; cost of the policy is usually a function of the value of the property, and is often borne by the purchaser and/or seller) and financing costs from your mortgage lender or a real estate professional. These will generally add up to between 2 and 7 percent of the property value. You’ll receive an estimate of these costs from your lender after you apply for a mortgage.
4. Add the down payment requirements and the closing costs together to determine the amount of money you’ll need right off the bat. But you’re not done yet.
5. Think about the actual move. Will you hire a moving company or rent a truck? Either way will cost you. The more stuff you have, the more it will cost.
6. Property taxes. Many lenders will require an impound account in which monthly payments for property tax (and often insurance) are paid together with the monthly mortgage payment. You can figure your average annual tax rate will be about 1.5 percent of the purchase price of your home.
7. Next, budget for maintenance and repairs. HouseMaster, a home inspection company with 300 franchises nationwide, said that based on a study that evaluated 2,000 inspection reports, the typical costs of major repairs are:
  • Roofing: $1,500 to $5,000
  • Electrical systems: $20 to $1,500
  • Plumbing systems: $300 to $5,000
  • Central cooling: $800 to $2,500
  • Central heating: $1,500 to $3,000
  • Insulation: $800 to $1,500
  • Structural systems: $3,000 to $1,500
  • Water seepage: $600 to $5,000
Once you crunch the numbers and find you come up a bit short, investigate ways to reduce or creatively fund your down payment—it can come from a variety of sources. Check with your realtor or lender to find out what’s available.
You’ll also need to factor in the cost of homeowners insurance. In addition to the type of construction, age of the home, your credit history and past insurance history, new issues like litigating costly toxic mold cases are raising homeowners insurance rates.
In fact, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners reports that homeowners will spent an average of $822 on homeowners insurance in 2007, the last year data was available.
In your final analysis of whether you can afford to buy a home, you’ll want to weigh the costs with the financial benefits—a consistent mortgage payment (unlike rent, which can increase), the tax benefits (you can deduct, in most cases, mortgage interest, closing costs, and property taxes), and the all-important appreciation factor—the rate of increase in a home’s value.
And of course, you’ll want to weigh perhaps the biggest benefit of all—having a place to call your own.

Kentucky Rural Development Kentucky Guaranteed Housing Zero Down


 This website is not an Government Agency, and does not officially represent the HUD, VA, USDA or FHA or any other government agency

  

Kentucky Rural Development

Kentucky Guaranteed Housing

Home Financing Options for Lenders

Think Guaranteed First!

Do you have clients with no down payment?  Do you have clients with some cash but they do not wish to exhaust all of it to buy a home?   How many times have you pre-qualified an applicant only to realize that the mortgage insurance or higher interest rates keep them out of the price range needed to accommodate their family?   The Rural Development guarantee may be able to help!

  • Generous income limits
  • Flexible credit and qualifying ratios can help open up a new market of homebuyers.
  •  Competitive 30 year fixed rates – no monthly mortgage insurance allows you to offer affordable payments to all homebuyers.
  • No down payment and no cash reserve requirements help you qualify more clients.
  • No maximum purchase price or mortgage limit.
  • Become an expert in Guaranteed Rural Housing financing to gain more clients and close more loans in small communities and rural areas.

Rural Development assists thousands of clients annually to become homeowners.  This year we want you as our partner!

The advantages

  • Loan up to appraised value plus the guarantee fee.
  • No monthly mortgage insurance (MI).
  • Maximum loan amount is the appraised value plus a one time guarantee fee.
  • No cash contribution or cash reserves required from applicant.
  • Unrestricted gifts.
  • Non-traditional credit acceptable.
  • Streamlined credit documentation available – based upon credit.
  • No minimum credit score.
  • Repayment ratios are 29/41.  Ratio waivers are allowed with documented compensating factors.
  • Not limited to first-time home buyers.
  • Competitive market based fixed interest rates with 30 year term.
  • Available secondary markets: wholesale lenders as well as Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and Ginnie Mae.
  • Qualifies for Community Reinvestment Act (CRA)
  • Agency approved lenders underwrite the loan.
  • Any lender, or broker, may originate loans through an Agency approved lender.
  • Agency guarantee commitments are issued within 1-2 business days of receipt of the complete package – based on volume of loan requests.
  • Rural Development provides lender support for questions, training, and outreach assistance.

 Choose Rural Development as the first option

  • A competitive fixed rate combined with no mortgage insurance provides long term savings for the customer.
  •  Home buyers are able to retain their savings since there is no down payment requirement and closing costs can be financed up to the appraised value.
  • Lenders report an overwhelming preference for the Guaranteed Rural Housing loans for the great value it provides to their customers.  Choose the best program for your customers!

Applicant eligibility criteria: 

  • Occupy the property as your primary residence.
  • Be able and willing to occupy the property.
  • Be a U.S. citizen, a U.S. non-citizen national or a qualified alien.
  • Demonstrate an ability and willingness to meet obligations and debts as they become due.
  • Have a credit history that indicates a willingness to meet obligations as they become due.
  • Have an adjusted household income that is within Rural Development guidelines based on the number of persons who will occupy the home.
  • Purchase a residential property that is within a Rural Development eligible area.

 Checklists and web site links:

  What is the Rural Development “guarantee?

  • Lenders have less risk with the Rural Development guaranteed loans than with conventional loans covered by private mortgage insurance.

Thank you for visiting our web site.  We look forward to working with you as partners in providing affordable housing opportunities in rural areas.  Let us know how we can further serve you.

Apply today for Free Below:

 
Apply below for free–I am a USDA Expert and have done over 200 USDA loans in my lifetime in Kentucky

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What is P.I.T.I


What is P.I.T.I?.

 

What is P.I.T.I?

September 17, 2012

When you’re buying or selling a house, there are many terms that come up. Though your local REALTOR can guide you through much of the terminology, there are some terms that you should be familiar with, and PITI is one of them. You will see PITI associated with your loan documents and mortgage paperwork. The following is an explanation of the term and the meaning of each of its letters.

P is for Principal
The principal is the total base amount of money that you are borrowing to buy your home. The principal is generally the biggest portion of the PITI figure.

I is for Interest
Whenever you borrow money or pay on credit, you have to pay an interest charge. The interest is usually calculated as a percentage and appears as an amount on the PITI breakdown. Depending on the deal you have, the interest rate can stay fixed for the term of the loan or it can be variable.

 T is for Taxes
Taxation is one of the eternal certainties of life! Taxes involved with home ownership typically go to governments at the local level to pay for public services. The tax amounts are typically included with the monthly mortgage prorated. The lender pays the tax on your behalf to the local government.

The other I is for Insurance
Your home is one of the biggest investments you will make, and a homeowner’s insurance policy is vital for your financial well-being. There are various policies from which you can select, but the choices available to you depend on how much money you put down on your property. If you make a down payment of less than 20%, lenders require that you purchase private mortgage insurance (PMI).  This protects the lender in the event of loan default or foreclosure. Similar to the way it is with taxes, these payments are generally added into your total mortgage payment.

Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for Kentucky Mortgages


Step by Step Guide to PrivateMI Cancellation

STEP 1

Answer these simple questions to see if you might qualify for PrivateMI cancellation:

  • Have I paid down my mortgage to 80% LTV?
  • Have I made structural improvements that will increase the value of my home?
  • Have homes in my neighborhood appreciated significantly in value?

If you answer ‘yes’ to any of these questions, you may be able to cancel your PrivateMI.

STEP 2

Gather basic information for your loan servicer:

  • Your name and Social Security number
  • Property address
  • Loan number

STEP 3

Contact your loan servicer using the information provided on your monthly coupon or invoice. Be sure to confirm the mailing address, email address or fax number and the contact person’s name for the letter.

STEP 4

Explain to your servicer that you’re interested in canceling your PrivateMI and request information on their cancellation requirements.

STEP 5

Meet any requirements provided by your servicer. These may include:

  • Supplying additional information on your home or loan
  • Having an Appraisal, BPO or CMA

Your servicer will arrange for this. If you do it yourself you may end up paying for two appraisals.

STEP 6

Send a request in writing for cancellation of PrivateMI.

STEP 7

Your servicer will notify you about the status of your PrivateMI cancellation.

Benefits of MI

Why should you consider a loan with Private MI?

  1. Affordable: In many cases, private MI is more affordable than other mortgage finance options. Private MI helps low- to moderate- income and first time homebuyers purchase a home with less than the traditional 20% down payment, with as low as a 3% to 5% down payment.
  2. Predictable: Private MI premiums are fixed and remain at predictable levels throughout the periodthe insurance is in force on the mortgage loan.
  3. Cancellable: A mortgage loan that carries private MI can be cancelled when the homeowner acquires 20% equity in the home.
  4. Alternative: A mortgage loan with private MI offers an attractive often less costly alternative to the government’s FHA program. Unlike FHA’s single family program, private MI programs offer a range of payment options keyed to the borrower’s needs and mortgage terms.

But don’t take our word for it. Read more about the benefits of PrivateMI, and use our tools to see if it’s the right choice for you.

VA Loans Louisville Kentucky


VA Loans Louisville Kentucky.

 

 

Louisville Ky FHA Mortgage Loans


Louisville Ky FHA Mortgage Loans.

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