Louisville Mortgage Underwriting Guidelines


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Source: Louisville Mortgage Underwriting Guidelines

Louisville Mortgage mortgage underwriting guidelines will help you understand your loan options when purchasing or refinacing a home. Now that you have found your dream house, you are going to need to apply for a Louisville Mortgage mortgage loan. Your realtor will either recommend a banking institution or you may already have one in mind. You will be dealing with a loan officer who will be compiling all the data on you to see if you qualify for a loan to pay for this house. All lending institutions have different Underwriting Guildelines set in place when reviewing a borrower’s financial history to determine the likelihood of receiving on-time payments. The primary items reviewed are:

Income

Income is one of the most important variables a lender will examine because it is used to repay the loan. Income is reviewed for the type of work, length of employment, educational training required, and opportunity for advancement. An underwriter will look at the source of income and the likelihood of its continuance to arrive at a gross monthly figure.

Salary and Hourly Wages – Calculated on a gross monthly basis, prior to income tax deductions.

Part-time and Second Job Income – Not usually considered unless it is in place for 12 to 24 straight months. Lenders view part-time income as a strong compensating factor.

Commission, Bonus and Overtime Income – Can only be used if received for two previous years. Further, an employer must verify that it is likely to continue. A 24-month average figure is used.

Retirement and Social Security Income – Must continue for at least three years into the future to be considered. If it is tax free, it can be grossed up to an equivalent gross monthly figure. Multiply the net amount by 1.20%.

Alimony and Child Support Income – Must be received for the 12 previous months and continue for the next 36 months. Lenders will require a divorce decree and a court printout to verify on-time payments.

Notes Receivable, Interest, Dividend and Trust Income – Proof of receiving funds for 12 previous months is required. Documentation showing income due for 3 more years is also necessary.Rental Income – Cannot come from a Primary Residence roommate. The only acceptable source is from an investment property. A lender will use 75% of the monthly rent and subtract ownership expenses. The Schedule E of a tax return is used to verify the figures. If a home rented recently, a copy of a current month-to-month lease is acceptable.

Automobile Allowance and Expense Account Reimbursements – Verified with 2 years tax returns and reduced by actual expenses listed on the income tax return Schedule C.

Education Expense Reimbursements – Not considered income. Only viewed as slight compensating factor.

Self Employment Income – Lenders are very careful in reviewing self-employed borrowers. Two years minimum ownership is necessary because two years is considered a representative sample. Lenders use a 2-year average monthly income figure from the Adjusted Gross Income on the tax returns. A lender may also add back additional income for depreciation and one-time capital expenses. Self-employed borrowers often have difficulty qualifying for a mortgage due to large expense write offs. A good solution to this challenge used to be the No Income Verification Loan, but there are very few of these available any more given the tightened lending standards in the current economy. NIV loan programs can be studied in the Mortgage Program section of the library.

Debt

An applicant’s liabilities are reviewed for cash flow. Lenders need to make sure there is enough income for the proposed mortgage payment, after other revolving and installment debts are paid.

  • All loans, leases, and credit cards are factored into the debt calculation. Utilities, insurance, food, clothing, schooling, etc. are not.
  • If a loan has less than 10 months remaining, a lender will usually disregard it.
  • The minimum monthly payment listed on a credit card bill is the figure used, not the payment made.
  • An applicant who co-borrowed for a friend or relative is accountable for the payment. If the applicant can show 12 months of on-time cancelled checks from the co-borrowee, the debt will not count.
  • Loans can be paid off to qualify for a mortgage, but credit cards sometimes cannot (varies by lender). The reasoning is that if the credit card is paid off, the credit line still exists and the borrower can run up debt after the loan is closed.
  • A borrower with fewer liabilities is thought to demonstrate superior cash management skills.

Credit History

Most lenders require a residential merged credit report (RMCR) from the 3 main credit bureaus: Trans Union, Equifax, andExperian. They will order one report which is a blending of all three credit bureaus and is easier to read than the individual reports. This “blended” credit report also searches public records for liens, judgments, bankruptcies and foreclosures. See ourcredit report index.

Credit report in hand, an underwriter studies the applicant’s credit to determine the likelihood of receiving an on-time mortgage payment. Many studies have shown that past performance is a reflection of future expectations. Hence, most lenders now use a national credit scoring system, typically the FICO score, to evaluate credit risk. If you’re worried about credit scoring see our articles on it.

The mortgage lending process, once very forgiving, has tightened lending standards considerably. A person with excellent credit, good stability, and sufficient documentable income to make the payments comfortably will usually qualify for an “A” paper loan. “A Paper”, or conforming loans, make up the majority of loans in the U.S. and are loans that must conform to the guidelines set by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac in order to be saleable by the lender. Such loans must meet established and strict requirements regarding maximum loan amount, downpayment amount, borrower income and credit requirements and suitable properties. Loans that do not meet the credit and/or income requirements of conforming “A-paper” loans are known as non-conforming loans and are often referred to as “B”, “C” and “D” paper loans depending on the borrower’s credit history and financial capacity.

Here are some rules of thumb most lenders follow:

  • 12 plus months positive credit will usually equal an A paperloan program, depending on the overall credit. FHA loans usually follow this guideline more often than conventional loans.
  • Unpaidcollections, judgments and charge offs must be paid prior to closing an A paper loan. The only exception is if the debt was due to the death of a primary wage earner, or the bill was a medical expense.
  • If a borrower has negotiated an acceptable payment plan, and has made on time payments for 6 to 12 months, a lender may not require a debt to be paid off prior to closing.
  • Credit items usually are reported for 7 years. Bankruptcies expire after 10 years.
  • Foreclosure – 5 years from the completion date. From the fifth to seventh year following the foreclosure completion date, the purchase of a principal residence is permitted with a minimum 10% down and 680 FICO score. The purchase of a second or investment property is not permitted for 7 years. Limited cash out refinances are permitted for all occupancy types.
  • Pre-foreclosure (Short Sale) – 2 years from the completion date (no exceptions or extenuating circumstances).
  • Deed-in-Lieu of Foreclosure – 4 year period from the date the deed-in-lieu is executed. From the fifth to the seventh year following the execution date the borrower may purchase a property secured by a principal residence, second home or investment property with the greater of 10 percent minimum down payment or the minimum down payment required for the transaction. Limited cash out and cash out refinance transactions secured by a principal residence, second home or investment property are permitted pursuant to the eligibility requirements in effect at that time.
  • Chapter 7 Bankruptcy – A borrower is eligible for an A paper loan program 4 years after discharge or dismissal, provided they have reestablished credit and have maintained perfect credit after the bankruptcy.
  • Chapter 13 Bankruptcy – 2 years from the discharge date or 4 years from the dismissal date.
  • Multiple Bankruptcies– 5 years from the most recent dismissal or discharge date for borrowers with more than one filing in the past 7 years.
  • The good credit of a co-borrowerdoes not offset the bad credit of a borrower.
  • Credit scores usually range from 400 to 800. Changes to lending standards are occurring on a daily basis as a result of tightening lending standards, and can vary from lender-to-lender– so this information should be considered simply a guideline. For conforming loans, most lenders will lend down to a FICO of 620, with additional rate hits for the lower-end credit scores and loan-to-values. When you are borrowing more than 80%, they typically will not lend if you have a FICO below 680. The FHA/VA program just changed their minimum required FICO to 620, unless you are qualifying a borrower with non-traditional credit. The few non-conforming loan programs that are still available typically require 30% down payment with a minimum FICO of 700 for self-employed and 650 for W-2 employees, and the loan-to-value will change with the loan amount.
  • A credit score below 600 may require an Alternative Credit mortgage program.
  • Misinformation on a credit report can be repaired! For more information see our credit repairsection.
  • The FTC states, “Credit repair companies take your money and vanish.” Anything a credit repair company does for a fee, a consumer can do for free. Be wary of these guys!
  • If a borrower falls behind on a payment, the creditor should be contacted as quickly as possible. Most creditors will work with a borrower who makes an initial good faith effort to communicate with them.

Savings

Lenders evaluate savings for three reasons.

  1. The more money a borrower has after closing, the greater the probability of on-time payments.
  2. Most loan programs require a minimum borrower contribution.
  3. Lenders want to know that people have invested their own into the house, making it less likely that they will walk away from their life’s savings. They analyze savings documents to insure the applicant did not borrow the funds or receive a gift.

Lenders look at the following types of accounts and assets for down payment funds:

Checking and Savings – 90 days seasoning in a bank account is required for these funds.Gifts and Grants – After a borrower’s minimum contribution, a gifts or grant is permitted.

Sale of Assets – Personal property can be sold for the required contribution. The property should be appraised and a bill of sale is required. Also, a copy of the received check and a deposit slip are needed.

Secured Loans – A loan secured by property is also an acceptable source of closing funds.

IRA, 401K, Keogh & SEP – Any amount that can be accessed is an acceptable source of funds.

Sweat Equity and Cash On Hand – Generally not acceptable. FHA programsallow it in special circumstances.

Sale Of Previous Home – Must close prior to new home for the funds to be used. A lender will ask for a listing contract, sales contract, or HUD 1 closing statement.

Debt vs Income Ratio

The percentage of one’s debt to income is one of the most important factors when underwriting a loan. Lenders have determined that a house payment should not exceed approximately 30% of Gross Monthly Income. Gross Monthly Income is income before taxes are taken out. Furthermore, a house payment plus minimum monthly revolving and installment debt should be less than 40% of Gross Monthly Income (this figure varies from 35%-41% contingent on the source of financing).

Example

An applicant has $4,500 gross monthly income. The maximum mortgage payment is:

$4500 X .30 = $1350

Their total debts come to:

$500 Car
$20 Visa
$30 Sears
$75 Master Card
—————-
$625 per month.

Remember, their total debts (mortgage plus other debts) must be less than or equal to 40% of their gross monthly income.

$2,800 X .40 = $1800

$1800 is the maximum debt the borrower can have, debts and mortgage payments combined. Can the borrower keep all their debts and have the maximum mortgage payment allowed? NO!

In this case, the borrower, since they have high debts, must adjust the maximum mortgage payment downward, because:

$625 debts
$1350 mortgage
————–
$1975 – which is more than the $1800 (40% of gross debt) we calculated above.

The maximum mortgage payment is therefore:

$1800 – $625 (monthly debt) = $1175.

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Kentucky USDA Rural Housing Loan Program eligible maps for 2014 updated.


It is with great joy (and a good bit of relief) to let you know that all areas currently eligible for the Kentucky USDA Rural Housing Program will remain intact through the end of the 2014 Fiscal Year (September 30, 2014).  The is also support in the Senate and the House regarding keeping the eligible areas for RH until 2020.

Now you can rest assured that it’s business as usual through September 30th on Kentucky USDA Rural Housing loans!

Kentucky USDA Rural Housing Census Eligibility Maps  Kentucky USDA Homebuyers will still be allowed to use the USDA  2010 Census data to determine eligible rural areas for Rural Development housing programs until October 1, 2014.

Kentucky Rural Housing USDA Property Eligbility Map for Rural Development Lpans in Kentucky
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As a reminder, all current Kentucky USDA Rural Housing eligible areas have been extended through September 30th, 2014 due to the passing of the Omnibus Spending Bill.
Changes to Kentucky Rural Housing areas can be viewed by selecting the applicable program listed under “Future Eligible Areas” at http://eligibility.sc.egov.usda.gov.

Apply for Kentucky USDA home now for free
Apply for Kentucky USDA home now for free
joel Lobb  Senior  Loan Officer
(NMLS#57916)
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
800 Stone Creek Pkwy, Ste 7,
Louisville, KY 40223
 phone: (502) 905-3708
 Fax:     (502) 327-9119
Kentucky USDA Rural Housing Eligibity Map for 2014
Kentucky USDA Rural Housing Eligibity Map for 2014

Locking In Rates


 

Locking In Rates

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When is it appropriate to ‘lock in’ our interest rate?

 

May 17, 2004

Good question. And, as with the answer to so many things, it depends. Some say:

1. It is considered a fool’s game to try to time the bottom of the market.
2. If you can’t afford to lose, you can’t afford to gamble.
3. Interest rates can, and do, go up…as much as 3/4% or more in one week.

Although we certainly have not seen evidence of it lately, interest rates can rise and fall often and rapidly. The Wall Streetmoney market” is manipulated by so many factors, it is extremely difficult to predict. Everyone is guessing what might happen, but no one really knows. If you want to be safe, you lock in as soon as your lender will allow it.

Sometimes you need a tough hide to “float” and ride along with the market fluctuations. If you do this, you believe interest rates will fall during the period of your mortgage processing, and you must be prepared to take the consequences if they do not.

Before you decide which way to go, be sure you understand your lender’s rules. Some allow you to lock in at the time of application, generally without cost for 15 to 30 days; some only let you lock in after you are approved for the loan and, in a busy environment, this can take a few weeks. Some will let you lock in for extended periods of time for a fee, often payable upfront and nonrefundable. Some will allow you a “float down” option that provides you with a lower rate if rates go down, typically for a cost.

As you can tell by some of my comments, I would suggest you lock in your rate as soon as you can…then forget about it. You will sleep better. There are not many people who can stand the uncertainty of gambling with this big commitment.

Discuss the options with your loan officer, be sure you understand whether you are getting a “lock” with the lender making the loan and what period it covers. I have heard horror stories of “locks” made for short periods when everyone is so busy, and the timeline for closing is just about impossible. That’s a promise that is useless. Be sure you understand what kind of company you are dealing with, whether you have a true commitment on your rate and fee, one that really be trusted and accomplished.

Good luck.

First Time Home Buyer Louisville Kentucky Mortgage Programs


First Time Home Buyer Louisville Kentucky Mortgage Programs.

Why You Can’t Get a Louisville Kentucky FHA, VA, KHC, USDA, Rural Housing and Fannie Mae Home Loan

Why You Can’t Get a Louisville Kentucky FHA, VA, KHC, USDA, Rural Housing and Fannie Mae Home Loan


Why You Can’t Get a Home Loan.

Why You Can’t Get a Louisville Kentucky FHA, VA, KHC, USDA, Rural Housing and Fannie Mae Home Loan

Credit

This is probably the most common hurdle. Lenders will have a qualifying credit score depending on the loan type, your background and other details. That baseline also applies to anyone else on the mortgage. So you might have an 800 credit score, but if your spouse is lagging at a 530, you’re going to struggle to obtain financing.

Even if you’re going it alone, lenders in community property states may still factor in your spouse’s credit. The average credit score for conventional purchase loans was 762 in September, according to mortgage software firm Ellie Mae. For FHA loans it was 701. Military borrowers interested in using their VA loan benefits will generally need at least a 620 score.

Debt-to-Income Ratio

Conventional and FHA lenders look at two different debt-to-income (DTI) ratios. The first, or front end, ratio compares your monthly income to your housing costs. The second, or back end, ratio considers the percentage of your income that goes toward major revolving debts like the mortgage payment, credit card bills, student loans and others.

Conventional lenders are generally looking for a 28 percent DTI ratio on the front end and 36 percent on the back end. For FHA loans, it’s more like 31/43. The VA program only uses the back-end ratio and wants to see 41 percent or less.

Your DTI ratio may not be an immediate application killer. Lenders calculate it based in part on your estimated monthly mortgage payment. It might break your heart, but you can always run the numbers with a lower loan amount to try and get that ratio into qualifying range.

Cash on Hand

Down payment requirements are here to stay (unless you qualify for a VA- or USDA-backed mortgage). Conventional lenders typically require at least a 5 percent downpayment, while the minimum on FHA loans is 3.5 percent. In addition, you’ll likely need to put down earnest money, which is basically a good-faith deposit with a seller, and be able to cover an appraisal, a home inspection and possibly other up-front costs.

Assets have become increasingly important in this tighter lending environment.

[Related Article: CFPB Could Pass New Mortgage Rules Soon]

Employment

Lenders want to see stable, reliable income and employment that’s likely to continue. The gold standard is generally two years, but that can vary depending on the lender, the loan type and the borrower’s circumstances.

For example, service members who separate from the military and take civilian jobs may not have to wait two years depending on how the new employment relates to their skillset, education and previous work serving our country.

What’s especially problematic is self-employment. There are a lot of unknowns for lenders here, and they’re almost always going to require at least two years of tax returns. Same goes for seasonal workers and those who work on commission.

Bankruptcy or Foreclosure

Foreclosure starts hit a 71-month low in November, according to RealtyTrac, but they’ve impacted hundreds of thousands of homeowners since 2008. More than 1.2 million people filed for bankruptcy protection in federal court in FY2012.

Each presents short- to medium-term obstacles to obtaining home loans. The waiting periods vary by event and by loan type. Bankruptcy means waiting anywhere from two to four years in many cases. The wait after a foreclosure can range from two to seven years.

Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer

(NMLS#57916)
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
800 Stone Creek Pkwy, Ste 7,
Louisville, KY 40223
 Fax:     (502) 327-9119
 
 Company ID #1364 | MB73346

 

Down-payment Assistance Programs Louisville and Kentucky


Down-payment Assistance Programs Louisville and Kentucky.

Different Types of Mortgage Loans available for 2013 Kentucky Home buyers and homeowners


Loan
Kentucky First Time Home Buyer Mortgage Loan FHA, VA, KHC, USDA, Rural Housing, Fannie Mae Ky Zero Down Home Loans
Different Types of Mortgage Loans available for 2013 Kentucky Home buyers and homeowners

Kentucky First Time Home Buyer Programs for 2017 FHA, VA, KHC, USDA, RHS, Fannie Mae Loans in Kentucky

All loans are subject to credit approval.Pre-Qual-Button-v2

Kentucky VA High Balance FICO Requirements

Minimum credit scores for Kentucky VA loans greater than $417,000 have been lowered to the following

Purchase/Rate-Term/IRRRL – Loan amount ≤ $1,000,000 : 640

                                                    Loan amount > $1,000,000 : 700

 

Cash Out –                                  Loan amount ≤ $700,000 : 640

                                                    Loan amount $700,001 – $1,000,000 : 660

                                                    Loan amount > $1,000,000 : 700

Conforming FICO Requirements

 Conforming loans, both Standard and High Balance. for these products as long as they meet our minimum credit scores as follows

Loan amount > $417,000             : 660

Loan amount ≤ $417,000 with MI : 660

Loan amount ≤ $417,000 w/o MI : 620

This only applies to regular Conforming loans and is not applicable to Homepath, DU Refi Plus, or any other Conforming program. All other requirements, including Maximum LTV, for these products will remain the…

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