Getting a Mortgage loan in Kentucky again after A Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcy.


via SURRENDERING YOUR HOME IN BANKRUPTCY

Getting a Mortgage Again in Kentucky after a Bankruptcy. Guidelines for FHA, VA, USDA AND CONVENTIONAL LOAN PROGRAMS.

 

mortgage after bk 1

 

 

Chapter 7 Kentucky Bankruptcy Mortgage Questions

How long do I have to wait to get a mortgage after my Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?

While different programs have different waiting periods, we offers some mortgage options as soon as 2 years after a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy for some Portfolio loans and 2 years from discharge for some government loan programs like FHA, VA, and USDA.

What type of loans are available for a Kentucky mortgage after Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?

We offer a wide variety of loan programs specifically tailored to Chapter 7 Bankruptcy borrowers in all kinds of financial situations: conventional loans, Kentucky VA home loansFHA loansUSDA loans, ! While you may not qualify immediately for all the programs we offer, we will present the best available options, with the best terms, and lowest possible bottom line to you. We customize your options based on your personal goals.

 


Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Kentucky Mortgage Questions

 

How long after bankruptcy can I get a Kentucky mortgage as one year into their plan.

What types of Kentucky mortgages are available for clients with a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

As a Kentucky Mortgage Broker we offer programs  after bankruptcy, we offer a wide variety of mortgages for Kentucky borrowers in all kinds of financial situations. We proudly offer Conventional mortgagesVA home loansFHA loansUSDA loans,

What is your waiting period for an Kentucky FHA Loan after bankruptcy?

We are able to secure our Kentucky clients with a FHA loan or USDA loan 12 months after being in the plan for 1 year with a perfect pay history from Chapter 13 Bankruptcy.

How long does it take to refinance after Chapter 13 Bankruptcy discharge?

Mortgages after Chapter 13 Bankruptcy can take as little as 30 days to as long as 3 months. We pride ourselves on great communication and efficient service. The most common issues that slow the process down deal with credit, title, property condition and how quickly we receive requested documentation from you. We love to help our customers clear up these issues and put them on a brighter path.

How long does it take to purchase after Chapter 13 Bankruptcy discharge?

Mortgages after Chapter 13 Bankruptcy can take as little as 25 days to as long as 2 months. We pride ourselves on great communication and efficient service. The most common issues that slow the process down are credit problems, problems with the property itself, and how quickly we receive requested documentation from you. We love to help our customers clear up these issues and put them more soundly on a brighter path.

Can I purchase a home if I am still in my Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Yes, you can! Purchasing a home during a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Plan does have extra steps involved though. Your trustee must approve your purchase and you must make all of your first year’s payments on time into your plan before purchasing a home. There are other challenges of obtaining a mortgage during a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy, but we are skilled at presenting a clear plan for success.

Can I refinance my mortgage with Peoples Bank if I am still in my Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Yes, you can! Refinancing a home during Chapter 13 Bankruptcy does have extra steps involved though. Your trustee must approve your refinance and you must make your first year’s payments into your plan before refinancing your home. Many borrowers find that waiting until after the 3rd year of on time payments is best for refinances. Some borrowers have also tapped into the equity in their home getting a cash-out refinance to pay off their Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Plan early. We have experienced great success securing trustees’ approval, especially when the refinancing option saves our borrowers a considerable amount of money.

How long does it take to get a mortgage if I am still in my Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Payment Plan?

Can I get a cash-out with my refinance after my Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Many clients choose to obtain a cash-out refinance after their Chapter 13 Bankruptcy. Often our clients have not been able to tap into equity in their home during bankruptcy to make home improvements or consolidate high interest rate debts. Our mortgage programs have different limits set on the amount you can take out relative to the value of your home. Don’t hesitate to call to discuss your options.

As a mortgage lender after bankruptcy, does Peoples Bank offer any options if I own my home outright?

We  have options to obtain a mortgage if you own your home outright. Although the wording is unusual, these mortgages are treated like a cash-out refinance. Cash-out options are best after the 3rd year of your Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Plan or as soon as one day after discharge.

Are there loan programs that do not require a large down payment if I had a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

we offer low down-payment mortgages after bankruptcy. FHA loans after bankruptcy have low down-payment options and both VA loan programs and USDA loan programs have zero down-payment options after bankruptcy. Your Mortgage Consultant will go over these options with you and determine if you qualify for one of the programs. They will present the very best options for which you qualify.

What credit score is required to obtain a mortgage after bankruptcy?

We have options for mortgages after bankruptcy with credit scores of 560 and up. .

 

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Compensating factors may affect the loan decision for a Kentucky VA Mortgage Denial.


via Compensating factors may affect the loan decision for a Kentucky VA Mortgage Denial.

Compensating Factors to over turn a Kentucky VA Loan Mortgage Denial

Compensating factors may affect the loan decision for a Kentucky VA Mortgage.  These factors are especially important when reviewing loans which are marginal with respect to residual income or debt-to-income ratio.  They cannot be used to compensate for unsatisfactory credit.
Valid compensating factors to over turn a Kentucky VA Mortgage loandenial should represent unusual strengths rather than mere satisfaction of basic program requirements.  For example, the fact that an applicant has sufficient assets for closing purposes, or meets the residual income guideline, is not a compensating factor.
Valid compensating factors should logically be able to compensate (to some extent) for the identified weakness in the loan.  For example, significant liquid assets may compensate for a residual income shortfall whereas long-term employment would not.

Compensating factors include, but are not limited to the following:

 

·   excellent credit history,

·   conservative use of consumer credit,

·   minimal consumer debt,

·   long-term employment,

·   significant liquid assets,

·   sizable downpayment,

·   the existence of equity in refinancing loans,

·   little or no increase in shelter expense,

·   military benefits,

·   satisfactory homeownership experience,

·   high residual income,

·   low debt-to-income ratio,

·   tax credits for child care, and

·   tax benefits of home ownership.

If you looking to get approved for a Kentucky VA Mortgage, give us a call today. We can go down to 640 credit scores for VA loans in Kentucky, and the maximum debt to income ratio on some cases can go as high as 50% with the above compensating factors.

Mortgage Borrowers Get Loan Approval With Lower Credit Scores in Kentucky 


Recent studies suggest that home buyers with low credit scores and high debt-to-income ratios may have an easier time qualifying for financing.

Source: Mortgage Borrowers Get Loan Approval With Lower Credit

 

∘ What kind of credit score do I need to qualify for different first time home buyer loans in Kentucky?
Answer. Most lenders will wants a middle credit score of 620 to 640 for KY First Time Home Buyers looking to go no money down. The two most used no money down home loans in Kentucky being USDA Rural Housing and KHC with their down payment assistance will want a 620 to 640 middle score on their programs.
If you have access to 3.5% down payment, you can go FHA and secure a 30 year fixed rate mortgage with some lenders with a 580 credit score. Even though FHA on paper says they will go down to 500 credit score with at least 10% down payment, you will find it hard to get the loan approved because lenders will create overlays to protect their interest and maintain a good standing with FHA and HUD.
Another popular no money down loan is VA. Most VA lenders will want a 620 middle credit score but like FHA, VA on paper says they will go down to a 500 score, but good luck finding a lender for that scenario.
A lot of times if your scores are in the high 500’s or low 600’s range, we can do a rapid rescore and get your scores improved within 30 days.

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Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer
 
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 | MB73346
 


Text/call 502-905-3708
kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant’s eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant  Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916 http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
 
— Some products and services may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. The content in this marketing advertisement has not been approved, reviewed, sponsored or endorsed by any department or government agency. Rates are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification.
 

Text/call:      502-905-3708

fax:            502-327-9119
email:
          kentuckyloan@gmail.com
 
 

Mortgage Borrowers Get Loan Approval With Lower Credit


 

Recent studies suggest that home buyers with low credit scores and high debt-to-income ratios may have an easier time qualifying for financing.

New loans for borrowers with FICO scores reaching as low as the 400s jumped from 21.9 percent in 2009 to 29.7 percent last year, according to the study. FICO scores range from 300 to 850.

From January to March of this year, borrowers who were approved for FHA loans—which offer low down payment options for first-time home buyers—had an average credit score of 672, according to FHA data. During that same period in 2011, the average credit score for an FHA borrower was 701. FHA borrowers also have had higher debt-to-income ratios in recent years. Debt-to-income ratios measure monthly household income against other debt, such as credit cards, auto loans, and personal loans.

Between January and March, about a quarter of FHA borrowers had a DTI of more than 50 percent, FHA data shows. In 2013, only 12.7 percent of FHA borrowers had such a debt load.

 

Source: Mortgage Borrowers Get Loan Approval With Lower Credit

 

 

Joel Lobb Senior  Loan Officer

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.

10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
 Fax:     (502) 327-9119
Company ID #1364 | MB73346E
http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant’s eligibility and market conditions.  NMLS#57916 http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
. The content in this marketing advertisement has not been approved, reviewed, sponsored or endorsed by any department or government agency. Rates are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification.

2018 Kentucky First Time Home Buyer Loan Programs


via 2018 Kentucky First Time Home Buyer Loan Programs

 

Getting a mortgage for a home can seem like a complicated and mysterious process. Just like any good investment, you should never buy anything that you don’t understand.  Knowing how the mortgage lending system works will relieve much of the stress and anxiety associated with making what is most likely the largest purchase of your entire life. This article will help you understand…

What You Need To Know About A Mortgage… BEFORE You Get One!!!

Qualifying for a Mortgage

Home LoansMortgage companies are in business to make money by lending money that is secured by an asset large enough to sell and recover their capital if the borrower is no longer able or willing to pay the payments. They are not in the business of owning property and would rather not have to foreclose on a loan, repossess the property and sell it to recapture their capital. This does happen but it is not their primary business. They would rather have their borrowers make their payments so that they could collect the interest and move on down the road. To increase their odds of that happening, mortgage companies look at several areas of your financial history to determine if you will meet their standards. This is called Qualifying for a Mortgage.

What the mortgage company finds when they look at these areas will help determine the type of mortgage that is available to you and the interest rate you will pay on the money that you borrow.

The areas that they are interested in looking at are:

Job History

Lenders want to know if you have been in your current job and/or profession for at least two years. They also want to know if you are retired or self-employed.

Income

TaxesMortgage lenders want to know how much your monthly income is before taxes are taken out (Gross Monthly Income). Typically you will be asked to provide check stubs for the last 30 days and Federal Tax Returns or W-2’s for the last two years to prove your income.

If you are self-employed and it is difficult for you to prove your gross income to the lender you may be able to get a “stated income” loan. If that is the route that you take, your income must be “reasonable” for your profession. Since stated income loans are riskier for the lender you will generally have a higher interest rate.

Credit History

Mortgage lenders really like it if you have a history of paying your bills on time. This is reflected in your credit report and FICO score. If you have “bad credit”, you are NOT automatically disqualified from getting a mortgage. Lower credit scores will increase the interest rate that you will be required to pay and sometimes that increase will be quite significant.

Debt Load

You can have an awesome job with an income to make Bill Gates jealous and a great credit score but if you have already acquired too much long term debt you may not qualify for the loan you want.

assetsAssets

Mortgage lenders will want to check your bank accounts to make sure that you have the cash necessary to pay the down payment and closing costs and that you have “reserves” available to make the loan payment. Often, the lender will require 3-6 months reserves. (Reserves can be in a 401K or other retirement account that you can pull the money out of)

Requested Loan Amount

The loan you are requesting will need to be proportional to your ability to make the payments. Be reasonable with your house buying expectations – don’t expect to buy a lot more house than you can afford. The recent housing bust defined the term “house poor” and got a lot of people into financial trouble. Again, mortgage lenders would much rather you make your monthly house payments because everyone loses if they have to foreclose.

Determining YOUR Mortgage Interest Rate

The market place determines the range of interest rates available for any mortgage and the lending rates change daily. The specific interest rate you will pay is based on how well qualified you are and the type of loan you want.

Interest rates are typically based on the answers to these questions:

How Good Is Your Credit Score? 

FICO ScoreThe most widely used score is the FICO score, the credit score created by Fair Isaac Corporation. Lenders use the FICO Score to help them make billions of credit decisions every day. Fair Isaac calculates the FICO Score based solely on information in consumer credit reports maintained by the credit reporting agencies.

FICO credit scores range from 300 to 850. That FICO Score is calculated by a mathematical equation that evaluates many types of information from your credit report, at that agency. By comparing this information to the patterns in hundreds of thousands of past credit reports, the FICO Score estimates your level of future credit risk.

With the top end of the credit score being 850, anything above about 720 is considered excellent. Some local lenders set 740 as the benchmark for their preferred interest rates. Having a lower credit score DOES NOT mean you will not get a loan. You may qualify BUT your interest rate will be higher than someone with better credit.

How Big Is Your Down-Payment?

down-paymentThe Down-Payment is the amount of your own money you are going to put into buying the property. The more money you put into the property on the front end, the lower the risk of you not paying the payments. The amount of your down payment also directly affects the amount of your loan (purchase price – down payment = loan amount). This is called the Loan to Value Ratio (LTV).

The LTV is the percentage of the value of the house that the mortgage will cover (loan amount / purchase price x 100). For example, the property you are interested in buying is selling for $100,000. You have $20,000 for the down-payment and want a mortgage for the other $80,000. The LTV for this mortgage is 80%.

Similar to the LTV is the Combined Loan to Value Ratio (CLTV). The CLTV is used when 2 loans are used to finance the home purchase. You may see or hear terms like “80-20” or “80-15-5”. This refers to the 1st lien percentage (80), the 2nd lien percentage (20 or 15) and the down payment percentage (5).

How Much Debt Do You Currently Have?

It only makes sense that the more debt you have the riskier the loan is for the lender. There is a finite amount of income in all of our households and it all gets allocated every month. Lenders use a “debt-to-income” ratio to determine how qualified you are for the loan based on how much debt you already have.

debt_to_income_ratioYour Debt to Income Ratio (DTI) is the percentage of your income that you owe in debt on a monthly basis. For example, if you make $5,000 per month, and have debt payments (car loans, credit cards, student loans, etc.) of $2,000, your DTI ratio is 40%. The higher this ratio is, the less likely you will be to qualify for a low interest rate.

Conventional loans typically have a qualifying ratio of 28/36. FHA loans will sometimes allow for a higher debt load of 29/41 qualifying ratio.

The first number in a qualifying ratio is the maximum percentage of your gross monthly income that can be applied to your mortgage. That includes the loan principal and interestprivate mortgage insuranceproperty taxeshomeowners insurance, and homeowner’s association dues.

The second number is the maximum percentage of your gross monthly income that can be applied to housing expenses and recurring debt. Recurring debt includes monthly payments for carsboatsmotorcycleschild support payments and monthly credit card payments.

 Example:  of a 28/36 qualifying ratio:

Gross monthly income of $5,000 x .28 = $1400 can be applied to housing.

Gross monthly income of $5,000 x .36 = $1,800 can be applied to recurring debt plus housing expenses

Example: of a 29/41 qualifying ratio:

Gross monthly income of $5,000 x .29 = $1,450 can be applied to housing.

Gross monthly income of $5,000 x .41 = $2,050 can be applied to recurring debt plus housing expenses

These are just general guidelines and everyone’s personal finances are unique. To get the real answer about how well you qualify and to determine how large a mortgage a local lender will offer contact one of our preferred lenders and visit with a loan officer.

Here is a KEY point to remember…

FICO KEYYour credit score is THE most vital piece of information

when qualifying for a loan.

I am a Dave Ramsey fan and I believe in paying cash but even Dave concedes when it comes to buying a house. In Financial Peace Dave calls the FICO score an “I love debt score” and brags about not having one. He even tells a story about trying to rent an apartment and he couldn’t because he doesn’t have a FICO score. He then says, “I can’t rent an apartment because I don’t have a FICO score… I could write a check and buy the whole complex but I can’t rent an apartment because I don’t have a credit score!” Which is a great story for someone that CAN write a check and buy the whole complex… The rest of us need to maintain a really good credit score.

If you’re ready to buy a new home

and want to shop around for the best deal on a mortgage…

Looking for a mortgage, auto or student loan may cause multiple lenders to request your credit report, even though you are only looking for one loan. To compensate for this, the score ignores mortgage, auto, and student loan inquiries made in the 30 days prior to scoring. So, if you find a loan within 30 days, the inquiries won’t affect your score while you’re rate shopping. In addition, the score looks on your credit report for mortgage, auto, and student loan inquiries older than 30 days. If it finds some, it counts those inquiries that fall in a typical shopping period as just one inquiry when determining your score. For FICO scores calculated from older versions of the scoring formula, this shopping period is any 14 day span. For FICO scores calculated from the newest versions of the scoring formula, this shopping period is any 45 day span. Each lender chooses which version of the FICO scoring formula it wants the credit reporting agency to use to calculate your FICO score.

What Type of Loan Are You Looking For?

40 year fixed, 30 year fixed, 20 year fixed, 15 year fixed, 10 Year Fixed, Adjustable Rate, etc. All of these loan types have different interest rate ranges.

Locking Your Interest Rate

Once you have completed a loan application, determined what type of loan you want and qualified for that loan you can “lock” the interest rate for that loan. Locking the Interest Rate means, for the period of the “lock” you are guaranteed that interest rate. Lock periods are typically 15, 30 or 60 days, although you may be able to get an extended lock period.

Rate LockOnce you lock your interest rate:

If you do not close on the loan before the lock period expires, you will NOT have a guaranteed interest rate anymore. And, the longer the lock period, the higher the rate will be. For example, a 15 day lock may be at 5.125%, a 30 day lock at 5.25%, and a 60 day lock at 5.375%. So, before locking your loan, be sure you are not locking for too long a time or for too short a time.

Interest rates fluctuate daily and may go up or down. By locking your rate, you are betting that rates will go up in the future.

 What does “Buying Down” the Interest Rate Mean?

You can reduce the interest rate on your mortgage by paying “points” at closing. A point is 1% of the value of the loan, so a point on a $200,000 loan is $2,000. If you “buy down” you loan to a lower interest rate you will have lower monthly payments and pay less interest over the life of the loan. However, “buying down” you loan to a lower interest rate means more money out of your pocket on the front end when you close the loan. You should do the math and weigh each side of the equation before making a decision about buying down the interest rate or not.

What Are The Closing Costs and Fees?

Closing CostsThere are four types of closing costs and fees…

Those charged by the mortgage company and/or mortgage broker, those charged by 3rd party vendors, those charged by the Title Company, Escrow Company or Escrow Attorney and Pre-Paid Charges.

Lender Fees

These can include loan origination fees and Broker fees which are usually a percentage of the loan amount; administrative fees and application fees, processing fees and underwriting fees. These last fees usually run from $100 to $500, and ALL of them are negotiable.

3rd Party Vendor charges

These are charges collected by the lender and paid to outside companies that provide a service. These are not usually negotiable and can include appraisal charges, flood certification fees, courier charges, document prep fees, mortgage lender attorney fees, etc.

Title Company charges

These are the fees charged by the Title Company, Escrow Company or Escrow Attorney. They are usually set by the state and are not negotiable. These charges include title insurance, attorney fees, state/county/city registration fees, etc.

Pre-Paid Charges

If the lender will be establishing an escrow account to pay taxes and insurance, the buyer will pre-pay taxes and insurance to establish an escrow account and will pre-pay the interest on the loan until the end of the month in which the loan closes.

 Does The Closing Date Really Matter?

The day you choose to close determines the amount of pre-paid interest you will have to pay. Closing at the end of the month means that you will pay less pre-paid interest. For example, if you close on October 1st you will pay 31 days of pre-paid interest. If you close on October 31st you will pay 1 day of pre-paid interest.

When Is My First Payment Due?

It doesn’t matter what day of the month you close on, you will not have your first loan payment due until a month has passed. So, if you close in October, your first payment is due in December – you get November for free!

What Is PMI?

pmi-basics1Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) is required on all loans that have a LTV greater than 80%. PMI is an insurance premium that you pay every month as part of your monthly payment. However, PMI is not intended to protect you. PMI is insurance coverage that protects the mortgage lender against default on the loan. If you stop making your payments, the mortgage lender is paid a percentage of the loan amount (usually 25% to 35%) by the insurance company.

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Customer Testimonials

We just moved here the first of January in 2017 from Ohio to the Louisville, KY area and we found Joel’s website online. He was quick to respond to us and got back the same day on our loan approval. He was very knowledgeable about the local market and kept us up-to date throughout the loan process and was a pleasure to meet at closing. Would recommend his services.

Angela Forsythe

“We were searching online for mortgage companies in Louisville, Ky locally to deal with and found Joel’s website, and it was a godsend. He was great to work with, and delivered on everything he said he would do. I ended up referring my co-worker at UPS, and she was very pleased with his service and rates too. Would definitely vouch for him.” September 2016

Monica Leinhardt

“We contacted Joel back in July 2011 to refinance our Mortgage and he was great to work with. We contacted several lenders locally and online, and most where taking almost 60 days to close a refinance, Joel got it done in 23 days start to finish,I would definetly recommmend him. He got us 3.75% with just $900 in closing costs on our FHA Streamline loan.

Kayle Griffin

“Joel is one of the best Mortgage Brokers I have ever worked with in my sixteen years in the real estate and mortgage business.” May 25, 2010

Tim Beck

“Joel has always worked very hard to keep his word and to work out seasonable solutions to difficult problems. He is truly an expert in FHA and other type loans.”

September 1, 2010 Nancy Nalley
“I have worked with Joel since 1998. He is a great loan professional.” I refer most of my Louisville, Kentucky area home buyers to him and he always take special care of them.

August 23, 2012 Jon ClarK

“Joel Lobb is a real professional in the lending industry, with many years of experience, he is the one to go to for any mortgage lending needs.” August 22, 2011

RICHARD VOLZ , Residential Sales , Remax Foursquare Realty
“When looking to purchase our new home in 2006, I had the pleasure of meeting Joel Lobb. Not only was he personable and easy to reach, he was extremely knowledgeable in his field and made sure to find us the best rate and a top notch mortgage company. We were able to complete the process in less than 3 weeks with his expertise. I find Joel to have the utmost high integrity and I recommend him to anyone who say’s they are need of mortgage assistance. He is also fantastic and keeping everyone up to date on the latest in the housing industry through his twitter posts. He provided great results for our family and we still communicate to this day!”

August 21, 2010
Stacie Drake

 

“We first use Joel on our new home purchase in 2007 in St Matthews, Kentucky area and he was great to work with. We have since refinanced our home with him in 2010 when rates got really low and he has always delivered on what he says. I could not imagine using anyone else.”

Melody Glasscock March 2014

 
Absolutely Amazing!! I emailed Joel after I had just got a denial from a bank and just thought i would try to get some advice on what my next steps would be to get a house. I honestly didn’t expect to even get a reply because my credit is not great. That was about a week and a half ago. I just signed a contract on a house last night. ONLY because of Joel Lobb. He even worked with us throughout the weekend, which shocked me. Best decision I have ever made. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR WORKING WITH US THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE PROCESS.
Cee Bellisle August 2017

Contacted him about buying a home and he was great to work with. I was moving to Louisville Ky to take a new job and he walked me through the entire process. He explained to me all the different options for FHA, VA, USDA mortgage loans and credit score requirements versus Fannie Mae. Since I was a first time home buyer I needed alot of help and guidance. I would definitely recommend him. Fast to respond and available to answer questions that I or my realtor had after hours.

 

Anderson Johnson April 2018

 

 

We moved from Michigan to Northern Kentucky area and we were really impressed. We got a USDA loan no money down and closed in less than 3.5 weeks. We shopped around online with other lenders but Joel was always first to respond and his rates were just a little better than other lenders. He kept us informed through the process along with our realtor and there was absolutely no surprises like we heard from other co-workers and friends that they experienced in their loan process. We have already referred another co-worker to Joel . He’s AWESOME!

Patty Kingston June 2018

 

The Truth About FICO Scores & Down Payments


via The Truth About FICO Scores & Down Payments

 

Most people believe they need excellent credit to buy a home, with many thinking a “good credit score” is over 780. In actuality, the average FICO® scores for approved conventional and FHA mortgages are much lower.

The average conventional loan closed in May had a credit score of 753, while FHA mortgages closed with an average score of 676. The average across all loans closed in May was 724.

What is the minimum credit score I need to qualify for a Kentucky mortgage in 2018?


via What is the minimum credit score I need to qualify for a Kentucky FHA, VA, USDA and KHC Conventional mortgage loan in 2018?

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